Slovakia amends constitution to define marriage as between one man and one woman

[JURIST] The Slovakia National Council [official website, in Slovak] amended the country's constitution [text] on Wednesday to specifically define marriage [legislative materials, in Slovak] as the unique bond between one man and one woman. Of the 123 members of Slovakia's parliament that voted on the measure, only 18 voted against adopting the amendment [voting record, in Slovak]. The amendment specifically denies same-sex couples the legal protections associated with marriage [Pink News report] by specifying that "it will be impossible for the rights and duties associated with marriage to be conferred in any way other than a legally recognised union between a man and a woman." Entities such as Amnesty International Slovensko and the Slovak LGBT rights organization Iniciativa Inakost [advocacy websites, in Slovak] have expressed concern [Slovak Spectator report] over the fact that the rush to pass the amendment gave the public little time to express its opinions regarding same-sex marriage.

Same-sex marriage [JURIST backgrounder] and the rights of LGBT individuals have been hotly contested around the world. In March a group of Ugandan rights activists petitioned the country's Constitutional Court to overturn a law enacted in February criminalizing the promotion and recognition of homosexual relations [JURIST reports]. Also in February Russian Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev announced a decree banning the adoption of Russian children [JURIST report] by gay couples or single people from countries that legally allow same-sex marriage. In January the Supreme Court of India declined to review its controversial December decision [JURIST reports] to reinstate a law criminalizing homosexuality in the country. That same month, the Parliament of Turkish-controlled Northern Cyprus passed a bill decriminalizing homosexual relations between men [JURIST report], making it the last European territory to do so.

 

About Paper Chase

Paper Chase is JURIST's real-time legal news service, powered by a team of 30 law student reporters and editors led by law professor Bernard Hibbitts at the University of Pittsburgh School of Law. As an educational service, Paper Chase is dedicated to presenting important legal news and materials rapidly, objectively and intelligibly in an accessible format.

© Copyright JURIST Legal News and Research Services, Inc., 2013.