Authors Guild files appeal in Google copyright claim

[JURIST] The Authors Guild [advocacy website] filed an appellate brief [text] on Friday, renewing its complaint that Google [corporate website] is violating copyright laws with its mass book digitization project. The brief, filed with the US Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit [official website], claims that Google's "Library Project" is scanning copyrighted works and making them available online without the copyright holders' consent, "driv[ing] potential book purchasers away from online book retailers, increas[ing] its advertising revenue, and stifl[ing] its competition." The original lawsuit was filed in 2005 with a settlement agreement reached in 2008 that was rejected [JURIST reports] by a federal judge in 2011. The Authors Guild has suggested that Congress instead establish a "National Digital Library" that would be available to schools, libraries, and other subscribing institutions.

The US Supreme Court [official website] in March ruled [JURIST report] that Static Control Components [corporate website] did not lack standing to bring a Lanham Act [text] claim in its copyright infringement suit against Lexmark [corporate website]. Earlier that month, Google and Viacom [corporate website] settled [JURIST report] a copyright infringement case relating to the posting of copyrighted material on Google's YouTube service. The Supreme Court in January granted review [JURIST report] for a case to determine the legality of Aereo's [corporate website] broadcast streaming service.

 

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