Family of Guantanamo detainee files lawsuit against Kenya government

[JURIST] The family of Kenyan Guantanamo Bay [JURIST news archive] detainee Mohamed Abdulmalik has filed a lawsuit against the Kenyan government claiming that he was illegally detained, tortured, and rendered to US authorities. The suit seeks Abdulmalik's return to Kenya and USD $30 million in damages. Abdulmalik was originally arrested by the Kenyan Anti-terrorism Police Unit in Mombassa in 2007 in connection with the 2002 bombing of a resort hotel [NYT report] and a failed attempt [BBC report] to shoot down an Israeli charter plane. He was then taken into US custody and eventually transfered to Guantanamo [DOD press release] where he allegedly confessed [HRW report] to the crimes, although his Combatant Status Review Tribunal [official website] report is still classified. British human rights group Reprieve [advocacy website], which has helped Abdulmalik's family, stated [Standard report] that the case points out the illegal means by which detainees have ended up in Guantanamo. Kenyan authorities deny [GlobalSecurity report] arresting Abdulmalik, whom they claim is not a Kenyan citizen, and handing him over to the US military.

The lawsuit comes as US authorities are working to close the Guantanamo prison. US President Barack Obama originally pledged to close the facility by January, but in October, US Attorney General Eric Holder [official profile] announced that the Obama administration may miss its January deadline for closing Guantanamo Bay, echoing prior statements [JURIST reports] by top administration officials. The Center for American Progress (CAP) [advocacy website] released a report [JURIST report] last month criticizing the White House for several shortfalls in its decision-making process regarding closure of the facility and disposition of detainees.



 

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