Officials vetting Guantanamo detainees for possible US trials: Holder

[JURIST] US officials are conducting reviews to determine which Guantanamo Bay [JURIST news archive] detainees may face trials in military or civilian courts in the US, according to statements [AP report] made by Attorney General Eric Holder [official profile] to reporters Sunday. Holder also said a decision on whether to hold such proceedings may come as early as November 16. The remarks came as Holder was attending the Sixth Ministerial Global Forum on Fighting Corruption and Safeguarding Integrity [official website] held in Doha, Qatar. Holder did not make it clear whether the reviews include those accused in the 9/11 attacks [JURIST news archive].

Last week, the US Senate [official website] voted 54-45 [roll call vote; JURIST report] to defeat an amendment [S AMDT 2669 materials] to an appropriations bill [HR 2847 materials] that would have prevented Guantanamo detainees accused of involvement in 9/11 from being tried in federal courts. In October, US President Barack Obama signed [JURIST report] into law the Department of Homeland Security Appropriations Act of 2010 [HR 2892 materials], which allows for Guantanamo Bay detainees to be transferred to the US for prosecution. The legislation came after Holder indicated that the Obama administration might miss its January deadline for closing the military prison at Guantanamo Bay, echoing prior statements [JURIST reports] by top administration officials.

 

About Paper Chase

Paper Chase is JURIST's real-time legal news service, powered by a team of 30 law student reporters and editors led by law professor Bernard Hibbitts at the University of Pittsburgh School of Law. As an educational service, Paper Chase is dedicated to presenting important legal news and materials rapidly, objectively and intelligibly in an accessible format.

© Copyright JURIST Legal News and Research Services, Inc., 2013.