Poland PM optimistic about EU constitution voting compromise

[JURIST] Following a Friday meeting [press release, in Polish] with French President Nicolas Sarkozy, Polish Prime Minister Jaroslaw Kaczynski [official websites] told the Polish daily newspaper Dziennik [media website] he was optimistic that a compromise on a controversial voting system for the European constitution [JURIST news archive] could be reached, although he later said it was too early to give details. His brother, Polish President Lech Kaczynski [official website], will meet with German Chancellor Angela Merkel [official website] this weekend, but Polish officials have said there would be no chance of a breakthrough this soon. Many EU states are hoping that progress can be made towards resolving the impasse in EU constitution negotiations at a summit in Brussels next Thursday, but yesterday Merkel expressed doubts [JURIST report] about what could actually be accomplished at the meeting. On Wednesday, Prime Minister Kaczynski indicated that unless negotiations on the voting system were left open, they would not agree [JURIST report] to any proposed treaty.

Poland has rejected the "double majority voting system" found in the 2004 draft constitution [text], which is supported by 25 member states, because that system diminishes Poland voting power compared to the 2000 Treaty of Nice [text]. Despite Poland's concerns, a recent German report noting key stumbling blocks on EU constitutional reforms made no mention [Reuters report] of the voting system. Reuters has more.

 

About Paper Chase

Paper Chase is JURIST's real-time legal news service, powered by a team of 30 law student reporters and editors led by law professor Bernard Hibbitts at the University of Pittsburgh School of Law. As an educational service, Paper Chase is dedicated to presenting important legal news and materials rapidly, objectively and intelligibly in an accessible format.

© Copyright JURIST Legal News and Research Services, Inc., 2013.