Egypt cleric alleges torture after 2003 CIA rendition from Italy

[JURIST] Speaking publicly for the first time, Muslim cleric Osama Moustafa Hassan Nasr [Wikipedia profile] said Thursday that he was tortured by Egyptian officials during his four-year detention in Egypt following an alleged 2003 kidnapping [JURIST news archive; WP timeline] and extraordinary rendition [JURIST news archive] from Milan. Nasr, who has been at the heart of Italian judicial proceedings [JURIST report] against US and Italian intelligence agents implicated in his alleged kidnapping, spoke to reporters outside the unrelated trial [JURIST report] of 22-year-old Egyptian blogger Abdel Kareem Nabil in Alexandria. Released from prison early last week [JURIST report], Nasr says he was tortured after being grabbed off a street in Milan and ultimately sent to Egypt. Late last week Italian Judge Caterina Interlandi issued indictments for 31 US and Italian intelligence agents for their alleged role in the abduction.

Testimony during the Italian proceedings leading up to the indictments disclosed [JURIST report] that the CIA had contacted Italian intelligence about the possibility of performing extraordinary renditions in the days following the September 11 attacks. Also last week, officials in Switzerland announced that they were launching a criminal probe [JURIST report] into the alleged unlawful use of Swiss airspace by US agents to transport Nasr from Milan to Germany. Milan prosecutor Armando Spataro has said he will likely try the US agents in absentia [JURIST report], as the US is not expected to turn them over for trial. AP has more.



 

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