Smoking bans approved in three states; voters split on tobacco taxes

[JURIST] Ballot measures approved in three US states Tuesday will ban smoking in many public places. In Arizona, Nevada and Ohio [JURIST news archives] voters chose more comprehensive measures over less restrictive versions generally favored by the food and beverage industry. Ohio's Issue 5 [text via smartvoter.org], for example, prohibits smoking in workplaces and other public areas, with tobacco stores and private clubs among the main exceptions. The alternative Issue 4 [text] would have allowed separate smoking areas in restaurants, bars and other establishments. With 98.7 percent of precincts counted, the Ohio secretary of state's office reported these unofficial results [returns] for Issue 5 Wednesday afternoon:

YES: 2,147,792 (58.3 percent)
NO: 1,536,102 (41.7 percent)

From Cleveland, the Plain Dealer has local coverage.

The more-restrictive smoking bans passed by smaller but still decisive margins in Arizona [Proposition 201 text; unofficial results] and Nevada [Question 5 materials; unofficial results].

Meanwhile, voters in Arizona [Proposition 203 text; unofficial results] and South Dakota [Measure 2 text; unofficial results] favored measures raising excise taxes on some tobacco products, while similar tax increases were apparently defeated in California [Proposition 86 text; unofficial results] and Missouri [Amendment 3 text; unofficial results]. Successful measures in Florida [Amendment 4 materials; unofficial results] and Idaho [Referendum 107 text; unofficial results] will restrict the use of proceeds from the 1998 settlement between the tobacco industry and state attorneys general [backgrounder].

 

About Paper Chase

Paper Chase is JURIST's real-time legal news service, powered by a team of 30 law student reporters and editors led by law professor Bernard Hibbitts at the University of Pittsburgh School of Law. As an educational service, Paper Chase is dedicated to presenting important legal news and materials rapidly, objectively and intelligibly in an accessible format.

© Copyright JURIST Legal News and Research Services, Inc., 2013.