Guantanamo commander says detainees no longer forcibly interrogated

[JURIST] US Rear Adm. Harry Harris [official profile], chief of the Guantanamo Bay [JURIST news archive] detention facility, has said that compulsory interrogations are no longer employed to elicit information from detainees due to their ineffectiveness as compared to "rapport building" techniques. Harris, who took command of the camp in March, told journalists this week that forcible interrogation had been phased out this summer, and that teams of guards in protective gear no longer go into cells to remove detainees who refuse to co-operate.

Guantanamo prisoners have also been informed of their rights under Common Article 3 of the Geneva Conventions [ICRC materials] pursuant to the US Supreme Court's June ruling [JURIST report] in Hamdan v. Rumsfeld. Reuters has more.



 

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