Legal news from Friday, October 13, 2006
20:10 EDT

[JURIST] The Maryland Court of Appeals [official website] unanimously upheld a preliminary injunction [opinion, PDF] this week barring the state from discontinuing Medicaid [official website; JURIST news archive] benefits to approximately 3,000 legal immigrant recipients, all of whom migrated to Maryland within the past five years. The ruling means that [read more]

15:10 EDT

[JURIST] The United Nations General Assembly [official website] appointed South Korean Foreign Minister Ban Ki-moon [official profile] as the next UN secretary-general [official website] on Friday. Ban, a career diplomat, is set to succeed Kofi Annan [official profile] when the two-term secretary-general steps down on December 31, 2006. Ban was [read more]

14:10 EDT

[JURIST] Pakistani Interior Minister Aftab Sherpao [Khyber backgrounder] said Friday that the US plans to release two Pakistani detainees held at Guantanamo Bay [JURIST archive] and that Pakistan expects the men to arrive in their home country by October 15. Sherpao also said that six other detainees being held by [read more]

14:10 EDT

[JURIST] The ruling party of Rwanda [JURIST news archive] announced Friday that it had directed its lawmakers to support a forthcoming bill to abolish the death penalty [JURIST news archive]. Leaders of the Rwandan Patriotic Front (RPF) [Wikipedia backgrounder] voted to take the action last weekend at a meeting chaired [read more]

14:10 EDT

[JURIST] The Supreme Court of Canada [official website] unanimously ruled Friday that a British Columbia judge overstepped his sentencing power when he ordered a convicted criminal on probation for sexual assault to submit to mandatory submissions of bodily fluids for examination. The court held that such orders were contrary to [read more]

14:10 EDT

[JURIST] A proposed $78 billion merger between telecom giants BellSouth [corporate website] and AT&T [corporate website] stalled unexpectedly Friday in the Federal Communications Commission [official website] after two FCC commissioners, both Democrats, asked Chairman Kevin Martin for more time to study it. The deal had already been approved [text] without [read more]

14:10 EDT

[JURIST] Mohamed Shorbagi, the Palestinian imam of a mosque in Rome, Georgia, has pleaded guilty to a charge of providing material support to a foreign terrorist organization (FTO) [US State Dept. materials], according to a criminal information and plea agreement [PDF text; press release] unsealed Friday by the US Attorney's [read more]

14:10 EDT

[JURIST] Freelance Croatian journalist Domagoj Margetic, charged [indictment, PDF; JURIST report] with publishing the names of two protected witnesses online, pleaded not guilty to contempt of court Friday at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) [official website; JURIST news archive]. Margetic is accused of publishing the names [read more]

13:10 EDT

[JURIST] President Bush on Friday signed a bill designed to strengthen US port security [JURIST news archive] by authorizing $3.4 billion to install radiation detectors, increase random searches of cargo and experiment with checking cargo before it reaches the United States. Speaking at the White House signing ceremony [official transcript], [read more]

12:10 EDT

[JURIST] The US Department of Defense Inspector General [official website] on Friday announced that the armed force's Southern Command [official website] has been ordered to investigate [press release] allegations that detainee abuse is occurring at the military facility at Guantanamo Bay [JURIST news archive]. Last week, USMC Lt. Col. Colby [read more]

11:10 EDT

[JURIST] US Rep. Bob Ney (R-OH) [official website] on Friday pleaded guilty [plea agreement, PDF] to charges of conspiracy and making false statements in connection with his involvement with lobbyist Jack Abramoff [JURIST news archive]. Ney accepted money and gifts [JURIST report] in exchange for taking actions on behalf of [read more]

11:10 EDT

[JURIST] US President Bush on Friday signed the Unlawful Internet Gambling Enforcement Act of 2006 [HR 4411 summary; JURIST report], a bill attached to a larger port security measure [Reuters report] late last month by Congress, making it illegal for banks or credit card companies to process transactions involving Internet [read more]

11:10 EDT

[JURIST] US Army Sergeant Ricky Clousing [advocacy website; JURIST news archive], a paratrooper and interpreter who disputed the legality of the war in Iraq [JURIST news archive], has pleaded guilty to going absent without leave for 14 months. A court-martial [JURIST report] in Fort Bragg, NC, on Thursday sentenced Clousing [read more]

10:10 EDT

[JURIST] A bill allowing a referendum on whether to oust Taiwanese President Chen Shui-bian [official website, BBC profile] was defeated in the Taiwanese legislature Friday. Sponsored by the People First Party (PFP) [party website; Global Security profile], the bill accused the president of corruption. Chen is currently under investigation for [read more]

09:10 EDT

[JURIST] A UK coroner's inquest ruled Friday that US troops were responsible for the "unlawful" killing of British reporter Terry Lloyd [BBC profile] in Iraq in March 2003. Oxford Deputy Coroner Andrew Walker concluded that Lloyd, an award-winning reporter for ITN [media website], was killed by a shot to the [read more]

09:10 EDT

[JURIST] A court in Japan [JURIST news archive] has dismissed an appeal by 81 plaintiffs who argued that the visits of former Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi [official profile] to a war shrine honoring Japanese dead as well as war criminals from World War II violated the constitutional separation of state [read more]

08:10 EDT

[JURIST] Members of Britain's House of Lords [official website] Thursday voiced their support for an amendment [JURIST report] to the Armed Forces Bill [legislative materials] that would pardon 306 World War I soldiers who were executed [backgrounder] for various offenses including cowardice, sleeping while on duty, striking a superior officer, [read more]

08:10 EDT

[JURIST] The Santiago Court of Appeals [Chilean judiciary website] voted 16-2 Thursday to strip the immunity of former Chilean dictator Augusto Pinochet [BBC profile; JURIST news archive], in a case involving the kidnapping and murder of a chemist who worked for the secret police. Eugenio Berrios was kidnapped and taken [read more]

08:10 EDT

[JURIST] The US State Department has rejected Britain's latest call for the closure of the Guantanamo Bay [JURIST news archive] detention center, saying the prison would remain open as long as necessary and was needed to house "some very dangerous people." UK Foreign Minister Margaret Beckett [official profile] on Thursday [read more]

07:10 EDT

[JURIST] The US Department of Defense (DOD) [official website] labeled anti-war activities as "potential terrorist activity" and monitored students, Quakers and other anti-war groups while collecting information for a domestic terror threats database, according to documents [case materials; press release] released Thursday by the American Civil Liberties Union [advocacy website]. [read more]

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