Legal news from Friday, October 6, 2006
16:10 EDT

[JURIST] A top US Marine Corps lawyer has called for an investigation of alleged abuses of detainees at Guantanamo Bay [JURIST news archive] after reviewing a sworn statement filed by a Marine paralegal who said that last month she spoke with a group of off-duty Marines who identified themselves as [read more]

16:10 EDT

[JURIST] British human rights group Reprieve [advocacy website] accused the United States in a report [press release] issued Friday of using Germany's Ramstein Air Base [official website] as a detention center for renditions [JURIST news archive]. Reprieve's sources claim that some of the 14 "high-value" terror suspects [DNI profiles, PDF] [read more]

15:10 EDT

[JURIST] Canadian prosecutor Robert Petit [Globalpolicy.org profile], one of the two active prosecutors for the Cambodian genocide tribunal that will try former leaders of the Khmer Rouge [JURIST news archive], told a meeting of international prosecutors at The Hague Friday that the prosecution team will be ready to present cases [read more]

15:10 EDT

[JURIST] The US Supreme Court [official website; JURIST news archive] announced Friday that it will reconsider [docket entry] the death penalty [JURIST news archive] sentence [case information] of LaRoyce Lathair Smith, convicted of murdering a 19-year-old Dallas Taco Bell manager in 1991. The Court initially reversed Smith's death sentence [JURIST [read more]

15:10 EDT

[JURIST] US Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Melson J. Bacos, a hospital corpsman, pleaded guilty Friday to kidnapping and conspiracy charges [UCMJ text] in connection to the April 26 death of Iraqi civilian Hashim Ibrahim Awad [Wikipedia profile] in Hamdania. A total of eight US military personnel were initially charged [read more]

12:10 EDT

[JURIST] As the National Hockey League [official website] opened its 2006-2007 season this week, the lockout that wiped out the entire 04-05 slate [JURIST report] has reared its head again in the form of a lawsuit filed against the players' union [complaint, PDF] by players themselves. The suit, filed in [read more]

10:10 EDT

[JURIST] New Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe [official profile, BBC profile] declared before parliament Friday that Japanese leaders during World War II were not war criminals. Abe, who took office late last month [NYT report], had said a day earlier that Japanese leaders were responsible for the deaths of many [read more]

10:10 EDT

[JURIST] US and European diplomats have reached an interim agreement on new trans-Atlantic airline passenger data-sharing policies [JURIST news archive]. Under the new regulations, airlines must continue to share 34 pieces of passenger data, including passenger names, addresses and credit card information within 15 minutes of a plane's departure to [read more]

09:10 EDT

[JURIST] The lawyer for Australian Guantanamo Bay [JURIST news archive] detainee David Hicks [JURIST news archive; AI profile] is pushing the Australian government to ask the US for Hicks' return by Christmas, allowing him to be kept under a control order authorized by last year's anti-terror legislation [official backgrounder]. David [read more]

09:10 EDT

[JURIST] The US Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit [official website] has granted an emergency injunction [order, PDF] suspending the application of Arizona's controversial voter ID law a month before the November 7 general election. The law, which Arizonans approved in 2004 [JURIST report] as Proposition 200 [PDF], requires [read more]

07:10 EDT

[JURIST] Ramsey Clark [BBC profile], former US Attorney General and a member of the Saddam Hussein [JURIST news archive] defense team, predicted Thursday that the execution of the former Iraqi dictator would lead to "catastrophic violence" and "total, unmitigated chaos." During a press conference, Clark theorized that Sunni Muslims in [read more]

07:10 EDT

[JURIST] Former Hewlett-Packard [corporate website] chairwoman Patricia Dunn [Forbes profile] and former ethics officer Kevin Hunsaker [BusinessWeek backgrounder] surrendered to authorities Thursday and agreed to face felony charges [felony complaint, PDF] stemming from their roles in the corporate spying scandal [JURIST news archive]. After a brief hearing, Dunn was released [read more]

Latest Readers

@JURISTnews

Support JURIST

We rely on our readers to keep JURIST running

 Donate now!

© Copyright JURIST Legal News and Research Services, Inc., 2013.