Legal news from Friday, June 30, 2006
13:06 EDT

[JURIST] The International Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) [official website] on Friday convicted [judgment summary] Naser Oric [ICTY case backgrounder; Wikipedia profile], a former senior commander of Bosnian Muslim forces in Srebrenica, for failing to prevent the murder and inhumane treatment of Serb prisoners. Oric, sentenced to two years [read more]

13:06 EDT

[JURIST] The Iraqi High Tribunal said on Friday that while coalition forces still provide physical protection for former Deputy Prime Minister Tariq Aziz [BBC profile; JURIST news archive], he has been safe and in no danger in the legal custody of the Iraqi judiciary since June 30, 2004, when the [read more]

13:06 EDT

[JURIST] USA Today reported [USA Today article] Friday that its inside sources at BellSouth and Verizon are unable to "document a contractual relationship" between the two phone companies and the National Security Agency, or document that "the companies turned over bulk calling records" for the alleged NSA phone records database [read more]

13:06 EDT

[JURIST] Arkansas Governor Mike Huckabee [official website] said on Friday that he would like the state legislature to consider reinstating a ban on same-sex foster parents after the Arkansas Supreme Court [official website] Thursday struck down [ruling, PDF; JURIST report] a regulatory provision barring same-sex couples from raising foster children. [read more]

12:06 EDT

[JURIST] The US military is investigating reports that five US soldiers raped a young woman in the city of Mahmudiyah [globalsecurity.org backgrounder; also "Mahmoudiyah", "Mahmoudiya" or "Mahmudiya"] and then killed her and three family members last March, an anonymous official told AP Friday. According to another official, one of the [read more]

12:06 EDT

[JURIST] Uzbekistan moved closer to abolishing the death penalty on Thursday as Uzbek President Islam Karimov [BBC profile] ordered the establishment of a commission charged with drafting anti-death penalty legislation as well as new criminal laws, both substantive and procedural, to implement the change. The order establishing the working group [read more]

12:06 EDT

[JURIST] A panel of federal judges in Texas has given parties to a lawsuit over Texas' congressional district two weeks to propose a solution [order, PDF] to the 2003 Texas redistricting plan [official website] for the 23rd Congressional District, which the US Supreme Court [official website] scrapped [JURIST report] on [read more]

11:06 EDT

[JURIST] Israeli Attorney General Menachem Mazuz [official profile] has said that a group of two dozen Hamas MPs and ministers who were detained [JURIST report] Thursday will not be held in administrative detention [B'Tselem backgrounder] under the Incarceration of Unlawful Combatants Law [PDF text]. Mazuz said he will instead use [read more]

11:06 EDT

[JURIST] Tenet Healthcare [corporate website] has agreed to pay $900 million [US DOJ press release] to resolve federal allegations of illegal Medicare billing practices. Tenet was charged [DOJ press release] in 2003 with violating the False Claims Act [text] by billing the government for services not provided to patients, billing [read more]

11:06 EDT

[JURIST] In a victory for German Chancellor Angela Merkel [official profile in German; BBC profile], a package of constitutional reforms aimed at separating and clarifying the powers of the federal and state governments passed Germany's lower house of parliament in a 428-162 vote Friday, with three lawmakers abstaining. After World [read more]

11:06 EDT

[JURIST] A federal judge has extended a temporary restraining order [PDF text; JURIST report] preventing the state of Georgia from fully enforcing a law that restricts where convicted sex offenders can live. The restraining order issued Monday applied only to the eight plaintiffs in the case, but US District Judge [read more]

10:06 EDT

[JURIST] The Turkish Grand National Assembly [official website, in Turkish; Wikipedia backgrounder] broadened the country's anti-terror laws Thursday by adopting new legislation that delays a suspect's guaranteed access to a lawyer for the first 24 hours of detention and expands the definition of offenses classified as terrorism. New acts classified [read more]

10:06 EDT

[JURIST] The French Senate and National Assembly gave final approval Friday to the so-called "iTunes" copyright legislation [legislative materials, in French], meaning the bill will soon become law assuming the failure of a constitutional challenge filed last week by the Socialist party. The government still has the option of amending [read more]

10:06 EDT

[JURIST] The US House of Representatives voted 232-187 [roll call] Thursday to approve the Deep Ocean Energy Resources Act [HR 4761 text], which "provide[s] for exploration, development, and production activities for mineral resources on the Outer Continental Shelf [DOI definition]." The bill, a version of which was approved [JURIST report] [read more]

10:06 EDT

[JURIST] Former East Timor Prime Minister Mari Alkatiri [BBC profile], who resigned on Monday [BBC report], on Friday refused to respond to a prosecutor's summons to appear for questioning in connection with allegations that he organized and armed a private militia. Instead, Alkatiri wrote a letter back to prosecutors saying [read more]

09:06 EDT

[JURIST] The UN Human Rights Council (HRC) [official website] has adopted [press release] the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples [PDF text], a document which asserts that indigenous peoples [UNHCHR backgrounder] worldwide should have the right to restitution of land and resources taken from them. Bypassing objections from [read more]

08:06 EDT

[JURIST] Australian Prime Minister John Howard [official website] said Friday that he wants Australian-born terror suspect David Hicks [JURIST news archive] to be tried in American courts even after the US Supreme Court [official website] on Thursday struck down military commissions [JURIST report; opinion, PDF] set up to try terror [read more]

08:06 EDT

[JURIST] Ta Mok [Trial Watch profile], the former military chief of the Khmer Rouge [JURIST news archive] communist movement in Cambodia who was indicted [PDF text] on crimes against humanity charges in 1999 and has been in detention [order, PDF] since 2002, demanded a swift trial Friday. An unexpected hospitalization [read more]

08:06 EDT

[JURIST] China has approved stiffer penalties for people responsible for industrial accidents and white collar crimes, state media said on Friday. The Standing Committee of the National People's Congress (NPC) [official website; government backgrounder] increased the maximum jail sentence from seven to 15 years for individuals who make employees work [read more]

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