Legal news from Tuesday, November 29, 2005
19:11 EDT

[JURIST] An Italian judge ruled Tuesday that a former CIA station chief in Milan is not protected by diplomatic immunity, upholding an arrest warrant issued for his alleged participation in the kidnapping of Egyptian cleric Osama Moustafa Hassan Nasr [Wikipedia profile]. The judge held that even though former agent and [read more]

18:11 EDT

[JURIST] The Supreme Court of Mexico [official website] ruled Tuesday that prisoners serving life sentences can be extradited abroad, overturning a 2001 decision [EscapingJustice.com backgrounder] that prevented such prisoners from answering to charges in the US insofar as punishment there might be cruel and unusual and not directed at rehabilitation [read more]

18:11 EDT

[JURIST] US Assistant Attorney General William E. Moschella [official profile] defended the use of National Security Letters [PDF sample text; ACLU materials] in a 10-page letter sent to the Chairmen of the US House and Senate Judiciary Committees Tuesday, rebutting claims raised by a Washington Post article [text] that NSLs [read more]

16:11 EDT

[JURIST] AP is reporting that Virginia Governor Mark Warner [official website] has granted clemency to Robin Lovitt [profile], a convicted killer who would have become the 1,000th person executed in the US [JURIST report] since the US Supreme Court reauthorized capital punishment in 1976. Lovitt was convicted of fatally stabbing [read more]

16:11 EDT

[JURIST] The first federal Vioxx trial, in which Evelyn Irvin Plunkett is suing pharmaceutical giant Merck [corporate website] for the death of husband Richard “Dicky” Irvin of a heart attack in May 2001, began Tuesday with an opening statement from Plunkett’s lawyer, who told jurors that Irvin died as a [read more]

16:11 EDT

[JURIST] Observers of the trial of Saddam Hussein [JURIST news archive] warned Tuesday that mounting political pressure threatens the independence and fairness of the Iraqi High Criminal Court [official website] trying the ousted Iraqi leader. A Human Rights Watch [official website] spokesman noted that although Iraqi Prime Minister Ibrahim al-Jaafari [read more]

16:11 EDT

[JURIST] A federal court in Maryland has ruled that US law enforcement agents must obtain a warrant before obtaining information from a cell phone service on the location of a cell phone user. In an opinion [PDF text] written by Judge James J. Bredar and issued Monday, the court noted [read more]

15:11 EDT

[JURIST] French Prime Minister Dominique de Villepin [official website; BBC profile] announced Tuesday that he would introduce stricter immigration controls as part of the French government's response to the riots [JURIST report] started by immigrant youth that broke out across the country in late October and lasted almost three weeks. [read more]

15:11 EDT

[JURIST] The Egyptian government does not plan to allow the Muslim Brotherhood [Wikipedia backgrounder] to become a legal political party even though it has so far won 76 of 444 seats by running candidates as independents in the three-phase Egyptian parliamentary elections, according to President Hosni Mubarak’s adviser Osama el-Baz [read more]

15:11 EDT

[JURIST] Louis Joinet, a UN official assigned to oversee the human rights conditions in Haiti [JURIST news archive], on Tuesday sharply criticized the Haitian justice system for detaining hundreds of people without charge, including Reverend Gerard Jean-Juste [BBC report], a political leader and member of the political party of ousted [read more]

14:11 EDT

[JURIST] US Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) Director Porter Goss [official profile] Tuesday denied allegations that the CIA engages in torture when interrogating detainees. In an ABC-TV interview [transcript], Goss said that the agency's interrogation tactics did "not come close" torture in the sense of inflicting "physical pain or causing disability." [read more]

13:11 EDT

[JURIST] Syria's Ministry of Foreign Affairs on Tuesday called for evidence implicating Syrians in the assassination of former Lebanese Prime Minister Rafik al-Hariri [JURIST news archive] to be scrutinized in the wake of an admission by Syrian witness, Hosam Taher Hosam, that he testified falsely [JURIST report] to the UN [read more]

13:11 EDT

[JURIST] One of Canada's top law firms has agreed to pay a $30 million settlement to former client Hollinger International [corporate website] for its role in failing to act in Hollinger's best interest during a series of now infamous transactions which enabled Conrad Black [CBC profile] to pocket tens of [read more]

12:11 EDT

[JURIST] France's National Assembly [official website] on Tuesday voted 373-27 in favor of a new anti-terrorism bill [JURIST report; draft text, PDF] that will increase the use of video surveillance and allow police more time to question terror suspects. The proposal, which still needs to clear a Senate vote in [read more]

11:11 EDT

[JURIST] War crimes prosecutors and former Yugoslavian president Slobodan Milosevic [JURIST news archive] were in rare agreement Tuesday in their opposition to a proposal by judges [JURIST report] of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) [official website] to split Milosevic's war crimes trial. Last week, ICTY judges [read more]

10:11 EDT

[JURIST] The US Supreme Court [official website; JURIST news archive] on Tuesday handed down a unanimous decision in Lincoln Property v. Roche [Duke Law backgrounder], reversing the US Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit, holding that a lawsuit filed in state court may be removed to federal court if [read more]

09:11 EDT

[JURIST] The Australian House of Representatives [official website] passed the federal government's anti-terrorism bill [text; JURIST news archive] Monday night, without amendments requested [text] by a coalition Senate committee and by members of the Labor Party. The committee recommended [JURIST report] Monday that a controversial sedition section be removed from [read more]

09:11 EDT

[JURIST] Arab news channel Aljazeera [media website] is considering taking legal action against President George W. Bush, after disclosures that the US president allegedly suggested bombing the broadcaster's headquarters in Doha, Qatar, in the spring of 2004. Last week, two British civil servants were charged with leaking a memo [JURIST [read more]

08:11 EDT

[JURIST] Lawyers for victims of Hurricane Katrina [JURIST news archive] Monday asked for an extension of a program which houses displaced New Orleans residents in hotels at government expense, at an estimated $3 million per day, totaling $300 million since August 29. The request to keep the hotel program going [read more]

07:11 EDT

[JURIST] Croatian President Stjepan Mesic [official website; Wikipedia profile] said Monday that Croatia may cease to function as a state if the government returns property to Austrian citizens that had been confiscated by Yugoslav communists after World War II as planned. During WWII, the Ustasa regime [Wikipedia backgrounder], allied with [read more]

07:11 EDT

[JURIST] Documents released Monday [DOJ news advisory] by the US Justice Department show that Supreme Court nominee Samuel A. Alito Jr. [White House profile] was actively involved in efforts to expand law enforcement powers while employed as a deputy assistant attorney general in the Reagan administration's Justice Department. The memos [read more]

07:11 EDT

[JURIST] Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas [BBC profile] Tuesday suspended primary elections of his ruling Fatah movement [party website in Arabic] amid election fraud said to be prevalent in Gaza and the West Bank. Primaries in the Gaza Strip were cancelled [BBC report] on Monday after Fatah gunmen stormed some polling [read more]

07:11 EDT

[JURIST] Ecuador's new Supreme Court [official website in Spanish] justices are set to be sworn in during a ceremony in front of the international monitors that oversaw their selection. The 31-justice court has been without permanent members since last December, when then-President Lucio Gutierrez [BBC profile] disbanded the Court [JURIST [read more]

06:11 EDT

[JURIST] President George W. Bush Monday called for more stringent Mexican border controls [transcript] and rejected the idea that his immigration proposals would allow amnesty for illegal immigrants, while at the same time vowing to keep the US "a welcoming society" and a "compassionate nation that values the newcomer." Bush's [read more]

06:11 EDT

[JURIST] Leading Tuesday's international brief, the Nepal Supreme Court [official website] has issued a stay order preventing the Nepalese Ministry of Information and Communication [official website] from enforcing its decision to close down Radio Sagarmatha [media website] for carrying BBC's Nepal Service. The radio station's offices and broadcasting facilities were [read more]

Latest Readers

@JURISTnews

Support JURIST

We rely on our readers to keep JURIST running

 Donate now!

© Copyright JURIST Legal News and Research Services, Inc., 2013.