Legal news from Friday, November 11, 2005
16:11 EDT

[JURIST] Attorneys for US Representative Tom DeLay [official website; JURIST news archive] have requested internal communications from Travis County District Attorney Ronnie Earle [official website] in an effort to uncover information showing opposition to indicting the congressman. DeLay's legal team hopes the documents will strengthen their argument that the conspiracy [read more]

15:11 EDT

[JURIST] Theodor Meron, president of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY) [official website], said Friday during a visit to Belgrade that the tribunal is becoming impatient [ICTY press release] with Serbia's "endless delays" in handing over war crimes fugitives, including Ratko Mladic and Radovan Karadzic. Meron spoke [read more]

15:11 EDT

[JURIST] The Supreme Court of Nepal [official website] has ruled to allow a law that prohibits criticism against the king and blocks private radio stations from broadcasting news programs. Last month, King Gyanendra [BBC profile] approved the ordinance [JURIST report] which authorizes imprisonment and higher fines against individuals who publish [read more]

14:11 EDT

[JURIST] The Pentagon has refused to allow expert witnesses to testify at the upcoming military commission [JURIST news archive] hearing for Australian terror suspect David Hicks [BBC profile; advocacy website; JURIST news archive], a decision that his US military lawyer says increases the likelihood that he will not receive a [read more]

13:11 EDT

[JURIST] The UK Labour Party government was accused Thursday of compromising the neutrality of the police force by asking them to support an anti-terrorism provision authorizing the detention of terror suspects without charge for up to 90 days, a proposal which was defeated [JURIST report] in the House of Commons [read more]

13:11 EDT

[JURIST] Leading Friday's environmental law news, representatives from countries surrounding the Barents Sea have held a meeting in Norway to discuss global warming and the Kyoto Protocol [text]. The Barents Euro-Arctic Council (BEAC) [official website] consists of representatives from Russia, Norway, Sweden, Finland, Denmark, Iceland and the European Commission. The [read more]

13:11 EDT

[JURIST] Peru announced Thursday that it is removing its ambassador from Japan to protest Tokyo's refusal to extradite former Peruvian President Alberto Fujimori [Wikipedia profile; personal website]. Fujimori was detained earlier this week in Chile [JURIST report] on an international arrest warrant and Japanese diplomats visited with Fujimori [BBC report], [read more]

11:11 EDT

[JURIST] Iraqi President Jalal Talabani [BBC profile; JURIST news archive] met with Pope Benedict XVI [official website] in the Vatican on Thursday, assuring him that new Iraqi constitution [JURIST news archive] will respect the rights of Christians. The Vatican was concerned that even though the constitution guaranteed religious freedom for [read more]

10:11 EDT

[JURIST] The Crown Prosecution Service [official website] released a report [PDF text] on Friday that shows prosecutions for hate crimes during April 2004 to March 2005 up 29 percent over the previous year [press release]. A record 4,660 people were prosecuted, and another 1,128 cases were dropped, many because witnesses [read more]

10:11 EDT

[JURIST] Australian Prime Minister John Howard [official profile] has denied complaints that controversial new anti-terrorism proposals [JURIST news archive; JURIST document] were "authoritarian" and would limit freedom of the press. Part of the plan includes allowing a 7-year prison sentence for sedition, defined as threatening the "peace, order and good [read more]

10:11 EDT

[JURIST] Televangelist Pat Robertson [personal website] told residents of Dover, Pennsylvania that they had "voted God out of your city" in local elections earlier this week by ousting eight school board members [JURIST report] who had supported teaching intelligent design in science classes. On Thursday's broadcast of The 700 Club [read more]

09:11 EDT

[JURIST] French immigrant communities and rights groups are criticizing the French government's decision to impose emergency laws [decree, PDF; JURIST report] in efforts to restore order after two weeks of rioting. The 1955 state of emergency law [JURIST document] was initially created to cope with a rebellion in Algeria, then [read more]

08:11 EDT

[JURIST] US Supreme Court nominee Samuel Alito [White House profile; US News profile] said Thursday that during his 15 years as a federal court judge, he never knowingly ruled on a case in which he had an obligation to recuse himself. Alito was responding to challenges made by US Senate [read more]

08:11 EDT

[JURIST] The Italian prosecutor's office in Milan has asked for 22 CIA operatives to be extradited to Italy to face charges for the alleged kidnapping of Egyptian cleric Abu Omar [Washington Post report] in 2003, according to an Italian prosecutor Friday. Omar was purportedly kidnapped on a Milan street before [read more]

07:11 EDT

[JURIST] The UN Joint Disciplinary Committee has concluded that the only employee fired during the UN oil-for-food scandal [JURIST news archive] did not violate staff rules and should be reinstated, according to the ruling obtained by the Associated Press Thursday. The three-judge UN appeals panel said that Joseph Stephanides was [read more]

07:11 EDT

[JURIST] Senior White House advisor Karl Rove [official profile] spoke at the annual meeting of the Federalist Society [official website] Thursday to commend President Bush's conservative nominees to the US Supreme Court and denounce judicial activism. This was Rove's first public appearance since testifying before a grand jury last month [read more]

Latest Readers

@JURISTnews

Support JURIST

We rely on our readers to keep JURIST running

 Donate now!

© Copyright JURIST Legal News and Research Services, Inc., 2013.