Legal news from Friday, September 16, 2005
21:09 EDT

[JURIST] Leading Friday's corporations and securities law news, the US Securities and Exchange Commission [official website] has formally set out its plans to alleviate corporate financial strain caused by Hurricane Katrina [JURIST news archive]. In a press release, the agency announced that it will extend various filing deadlines for corporations [read more]

20:09 EDT

[JURIST] The UN General Assembly High-level Plenary Friday evening approved a watered-down [JURIST report] 35-page package of modest institutional reforms and global policy initiatives in the culminating moment of the biggest summit [official World Summit 2005 website; JURIST news archive] of heads of state and government in UN history. Progress [read more]

16:09 EDT

[JURIST] Newspaper publishing giant Hollinger International Inc. [corporate website; Wikipedia backgrounder] announced Friday that it had reached a $20 million settlement in a class-action lawsuit brought by advertisers over claims that it inflated circulation figures for the Chicago Sun-Times [media website]. Under the settlement reached after six months of negotiations, [read more]

16:09 EDT

[JURIST] A US district judge Friday ordered mediation in a civil suit brought by the US Securities and Exchange Commission [official website] against former HealthSouth [corporate website] CEO Richard Scrushy [official website], raising the possibility of settlement in the $800 million suit [SEC news release]. US District Judge Inge Johnson [read more]

15:09 EDT

[JURIST] Leading Friday's states brief, the Kentucky Court of Appeals [official website] ruled today that a one-room religious school must comply with health and plumbing regulations even if doing so would infringe on their sectarian beliefs. The school was closed by the Todd County Health Department after the department determined [read more]

15:09 EDT

[JURIST] Police in Nepal [JURIST news archive] Friday arrested 87 journalists protesting restrictions placed on the media since King Gyanendra [BBC profile] seized power [JURIST report] in February. Police also arrested 200 other protestors at a pro-democracy demonstration in Kathmandu attended by thousands. Protests have continued [JURIST report] throughout the [read more]

15:09 EDT

[JURIST] The International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia [official website; JURIST news archive] announced Friday that it had taken Bosnian Serb war crimes suspect Sredoje Lukic [ICTY case backgrounder] into custody almost seven years after he was originally indicted. Lukic, a former policeman, is alleged to have been a [read more]

14:09 EDT

[JURIST] UN Secretary General Kofi Annan [official profile; JURIST news archive] has called on Iraq to make its constitutional process [JURIST news archive] more transparent and inclusive. Such an approach would create a broader consensus leading up to the planned Oct. 15 referendum [JURIST report], Annan told the UN Security [read more]

13:09 EDT

[JURIST] The UN on Friday evacuated 11 Uzbek refugees to London after they fled to Kyrgyzstan [JURIST news archive] following deadly riots [JURIST report] that erupted in Andijan last spring. The 11 refugees were accused of terrorism by the Uzbekistan [JURIST news archive] government, but the UN plans to relocate [read more]

13:09 EDT

[JURIST] The New Jersey Republican Party [official website] has called on NJ Attorney General Peter Harvey [official profile] to investigate widespread election irregularities it said it discovered in its own four-month probe. According to Republican State Committee Chairman Tom Wilson, more than 6,500 voters cast ballots in New Jersey and [read more]

12:09 EDT

[JURIST] The Nepalese army has resorted to systematic torture to gain intelligence and confessions in its continuing fight against Maoist rebels in the country, the Special Rapporteur of the UN Commission on Human Rights [official website] said Friday. Special Rapporteur Manfred Nowak, who has been investigating claims of abuse for [read more]

12:09 EDT

[JURIST] A federal judge on Friday gave US Airways [corporate website] the green light to emerge from Chapter 11 bankruptcy [SEC backgrounder], a little more than a year after the beleaguered airline sought protection. The approval clears the way for the airline to complete its merger [JURIST report] with America [read more]

12:09 EDT

[JURIST] In Friday's environmental law news, four states have sued [press release] the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) [official website] for failing to impose effective controls against invasive wood-eating beetles. New York, California, Connecticut and Illinois filed a lawsuit [PDF complaint] which alleges that the USDA does not do enough [read more]

12:09 EDT

[JURIST] Educational institutions across the United States took up the subject of the US Constitution [Library of Congress backgrounder and documents] for a day Friday, each with their own twist. The nationwide history lesson for students in schools and universities marks the first Constitution Day [official website; National Archives materials] [read more]

11:09 EDT

[JURIST] A German state court in Stuttgart ruled Thursday that a federal prosecutor is not required to bring war crimes charges against US Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld in connection with abuses at Iraq's Abu Ghraib prison [JURIST news archive] in 2003 and 2004. Federal Prosecutor Kay Nehm [official profile [read more]

09:09 EDT

[JURIST] Swiss President Samuel Schmid [official website; Wikipedia profile] joined other world leaders calling for UN reform [JURIST news archive] Thursday, saying in his address [PDF statement] to the UN's 2005 World Summit [official website] that the UN must prioritize the creation of a new Human Rights Council. Schmid called [read more]

09:09 EDT

[JURIST] UK Prime Minister Tony Blair Friday defended his decision to toughen Britain's anti-terror laws a day after Home Secretary Chatles Clarke released the text of new draft legislation [JURIST report] providing for extended detention without trial and making the "glorification" of terrorism an offense. Blair told BBC Radio [Radio [read more]

08:09 EDT

[JURIST] Japanese Foreign Minister Nobutaka Machimura [official profile] and Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi [official website] are continuing their bid for Japan [JURIST news archive] to become a member of the UN Security Council [official website] as part of ongoing discussion on UN reform [JURIST news archive]. Koizumi addressed [PDF statement] [read more]

08:09 EDT

[JURIST] US Attorney General Alberto Gonzales [official website; DOJ press release] said Thursday that the Department of Justice will fight to overturn Wednesday's federal court ruling [JURIST report] that the Pledge of Allegiance [JURIST news archive] with the words "under God" cannot be recited in public schools. Gonzales said that [read more]

08:09 EDT

[JURIST] The US Senate Judiciary Committee [official website] concluded its four days of confirmation hearings for Chief Justice nominee John Roberts [JURIST news archive] late Thursday, with closing remarks [SCOTUSblog report] from committee chairman Arlen Specter (R-PA) and ranking Democrat Pat Leahy (D-VT). Following the conclusion of Roberts' own testimony [read more]

07:09 EDT

[JURIST] Missouri Governor Matt Blunt [official website] signed legislation [SB 1 text] Thursday authorizing lawsuits against anyone who helps teenagers get abortions in violation of Missouri's parental consent law. The law is aimed partly at preventing teens from getting abortions in neighboring Illinois, which does not have a parental consent [read more]

07:09 EDT

[JURIST] Robert Parton, a former investigator for the Independent Inquiry Committee [official website] into the now defunct UN Oil-for-Food program [official website; JURIST news archive], has reached a deal with the United Nations and the US Congress under which Congress will retain thousands of pages of UN documents for review [read more]

07:09 EDT

[JURIST] The latest Guantanamo Bay [JURIST news archive] hunger strike has expanded to include 131 participants and is now at its largest point since the protest began a month ago, a military official said Thursday. According to the military, the latest strike began on August 8 with 76 detainees protesting [read more]

06:09 EDT

[JURIST] US soldiers serving in Iraq relied on techniques they remembered from movies to interrogate prisoners, according to documents released Thursday by the American Civil Liberties Union [advocacy website] as part of its ongoing Freedom of Information Act requests [ACLU materials; JURIST news archive] regarding treatment of US-held detainees in [read more]

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