Thousands protest ruling against Hawaiian school policy

[JURIST] Three days after a panel of the US Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit [official website] overturned a lower court ruling and struck down a Hawaiian school policy of only admitting native Hawaiians [JURIST report], nearly 15,000 people marched through downtown Honolulu Saturday to protest. The schools were established in 1883 and educate about 5,100 Hawaiian students from kindergarten through through high school. Operating costs are covered in large part by a trust now worth $6.2 billion and they receives no federal funding. The state contended that the restriction on admission was necessary to remedy economic and educational disadvantages suffered by natives. The court found [PDF opinion] that the Kamehameha Schools [education website] policy violated 42 USC 1981 [text], which forbids racial discrimination in making and enforcing contracts. Kamehameha Schools has said it will appeal. AP has more.



 

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