Iraqi survey shows support for women's rights, decentralized government

[JURIST] In the first national poll conducted by the government in Iraq, over two-thirds of all respondents said they favored increased rights for women, so long as those rights did not violate the teachings of Islam. The poll, which was conducted by a sub-committee of the Iraqi Constitutional Commission [official website], was distributed to over 150,000 Iraqi citizens and also asked questions concerning the type of government favored most and the role of religion in the constitution. Over half of the survey participants said they favored a decentralized government, while over one quarter said they wanted a strong central government. Over half of the respondents wanted Islam to play a significant part in the country's government, with 25 percent saying that Islam should be the only source of legislation. JURIST's Paper Chase has continuing coverage of the Iraqi constitution [JURIST news archive]. AP has more



 

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