Legal news from Monday, August 8, 2005
18:08 EDT

[JURIST] Leading Monday's corporations and securities law brief, Warren Buffett [Wikipedia profile] company Berkshire Hathaway has revealed that the management company is being investigated by the SEC and the state of New York, among others. In a filing [text] with the SEC, the company said that the government has been [read more]

17:08 EDT

[JURIST] Leading Monday's states brief, the US Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals has denied a request [PDF text] to suspend an Iowa state law that prohibits certain sex offenders from living within 2000 feet of a school or day care center, pending a possible US Supreme Court review. The court [read more]

16:08 EDT

[JURIST] Argentinian police announced on Monday the arrest of Milan Lukic, a former Bosnian Serb paramilitary commander who in July was convicted in absentia [JURIST report] by a Serbian war crimes court and sentenced to 20 years for his role in the 1993 abduction and killing of 20 Bosnian Muslims. [read more]

15:08 EDT

[JURIST] A new Florida policy that took effect on June 1 bans sex offenders [FDLE Sex Offenders and Predators website] from public hurricane shelters [list, by county] if they are under state supervision and not permitted near children. Instead, they must report to a prison, where they are kept under [read more]

14:08 EDT

[JURIST] According to US military leaders, the Pentagon has established new contingency plans for domestic military deployment in the event of a terrorist attack, but the procedures may challenge traditional doctrines constraining military roles in national law enforcement. The plans envisage US military forces under the aegis of the new [read more]

14:08 EDT

[JURIST] An civil liberties oversight panel created by Congress last year in response to a recommendation by the 9/11 Commission [official website] has yet to meet almost eight months after its inception. The Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board [CRS backgrounder, PDF] was created as part of an intelligence reform [read more]

14:08 EDT

[JURIST] A new report released Monday by a UN panel accused Benon Sevan [UN profile], the former head of the UN Oil-for-Food Program [official website; JURIST news archive], of taking almost $150,000 in bribes. The Third Interim Report [PDF text; press release] by the Independent Inquiry Committee [official website] also [read more]

14:08 EDT

[JURIST] President George W. Bush Monday signed into law a massive energy bill while in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The 1,725-page legislation [text], finalized after weeks of compromise between the US House [JURIST report] and Senate [JURIST report], provides $14.5 billion in energy tax breaks, mostly to companies who deal in [read more]

13:08 EDT

[JURIST] The family of Saddam Hussein [JURIST news archive] said in a statement Monday that they have granted Khalil Dulaimi, an Iraqi lawyer already serving on his defense team, the exclusive right to represent the deposed Iraqi president, dissolving his earlier Jordan-based legal team. Dulaimi previously demanded that the Iraqi [read more]

13:08 EDT

[JURIST] Muktar Said Ibrahim, Ramzi Mohammed and Yassin Hassan Omar, three of the primary suspects in the failed July 21 London bombings [JURIST news archive] appeared in court on Monday after being charged [JURIST report] with attempted murder, conspiracy to murder and possessing or making explosives. Each suspect faces a [read more]

13:08 EDT

[JURIST] An extradition treaty between Pakistan and Britain is in the "final stages", according to a spokesman for the Pakistani government. The official declined to elaborate on how many wanted persons may be traded between the two countries after the treaty is finalized. No such formal agreement between the two [read more]

12:08 EDT

[JURIST] Japan's House of Concilors [official website, English version], the upper house of the Japanese parliament, voted 125-108 Monday to defeat a plan by Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi [Wikipedia profile; official website, English version] to privatize the nation's postal service [official website], Thirty members of the ruling Liberal Democratic Party [read more]

11:08 EDT

[JURIST] Former UK Home Secretary David Blunkett [Wikipedia profile] lined up over the weekend behind British Prime Minister Tony Blair and his new proposals for changing Britain's anti-terrorism laws [JURIST report], saying that parliament, not the courts, should be primarily responsible for protecting the security of the country:If the judiciary [read more]

11:08 EDT

[JURIST] A Yemeni court on Monday sentenced six men to jail for planning to blow up the British and Italian embassies and the French cultural center in Sanaa. The six men, believed to be members of al Qaeda, received sentences of three months to four years in prison. Two other [read more]

10:08 EDT

[JURIST] Noaman Gomaa, a law professor who is one of two top challengers to Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak [Wikipedia profile] in Egypt's upcoming September elections [JURIST report], promised Sunday to repeal Egypt's controversial emergency law [EOHR backgrounder] and release political prisoners if elected. The law was passed in 1981 after [read more]

10:08 EDT

[JURIST] Officials in Qatar on Monday launched a new human rights department which will function as a branch of the country's Interior Ministry [official website, English version]. The department will work closely with the National Human Rights Committee, a state-financed human rights watchdog, as well as other embassies, the labor [read more]

10:08 EDT

[JURIST] After Iraq accused Kuwait last week of encroaching on Iraqi terroritory and even stealing Iraqi oil [JURIST report], an Iraqi official said Monday that inspections showed no border violations being committed. Khaled al-Atiyah, who headed the inspection as an envoy to Kuwait, instead detailed a few Iraqi encroachments of [read more]

09:08 EDT

[JURIST] The so-called G-4 plan [JURIST news archive] for expansion of the UN Security Council [official website] now appears likely to fail as talks with the African Union to back the plan have broken down. Japan, Brazil, Germany and India along with the African Union had originally agreed to submit [read more]

09:08 EDT

[JURIST] Iraqi President Jalal Talabani [Wikipedia profile] welcomed a diverse group of leaders to his Baghdad residence on Sunday in an effort to sort out the remaining stumbling blocks [JURIST report] in the Iraq constitution [JURIST news archive]. Talabani also met with the US ambassador, who on Saturday had cautioned [read more]

09:08 EDT

[JURIST] In a speech to the American Bar Association [official website] annual meeting in Chicago this weekend, US Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens [Wikipedia profile] noted "serious flaws'' in the American capital punishment system, though he stopped short of saying it should be completely done away with. Stevens pointed [read more]

09:08 EDT

[JURIST] Haroon Rashid Aswat [Wikipedia profile], a British man who was arrested by Zambian police [JURIST report] last week, was returned to the UK on Sunday to face charges that he made phone calls to the bombers in preparation for the July 7 London bombing attacks. He was subsequently arrested [read more]

08:08 EDT

[JURIST] Sixty years after deadly atomic blasts hit the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki [Wikipedia backgrounder], thousands rallied across the US over the weekend to call for a ban on nuclear weapons. Protesters gathered in New Mexico, Tennessee, California, and Nevada at sites with historical significance linking them to [read more]

07:08 EDT

[JURIST] Three days after a panel of the US Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit [official website] overturned a lower court ruling and struck down a Hawaiian school policy of only admitting native Hawaiians [JURIST report], nearly 15,000 people marched through downtown Honolulu Saturday to protest. The schools were [read more]

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