Indonesian court allows mining in protected forests

[JURIST] Indonesia's highest court Thursday rejected a challenge from environmental groups and upheld a law enabling 13 mining companies to operate in protected forests. The Constitutional Court ruled that the law did not violate the 1945 constitution [text] and that the government must honor commitments to the companies [Dow Jones Newswires report]. Such mining was banned in 1999 but in 2004 a law allowed companies with existing contracts to continue operations. That law was upheld in Thursday's ruling. AP has more. Meanwhile, Indonesia has affirmed its environmental claim against Newmont Mining Corporation [corporate website; JURIST report], a US company it alleges polluted a local bay. The government filed a $133 million civil suit against Newmont, which denies the charges [press release]. Conflicting test results have delayed the trial, and a settlement is now being considered [AP report].



 

About Paper Chase

Paper Chase is JURIST's real-time legal news service, powered by a team of 30 law student reporters and editors led by law professor Bernard Hibbitts at the University of Pittsburgh School of Law. As an educational service, Paper Chase is dedicated to presenting important legal news and materials rapidly, objectively and intelligibly in an accessible format.

© Copyright JURIST Legal News and Research Services, Inc., 2013.