New Iraqi parliament sworn in amid attacks

[JURIST] Surrounded by heavy security, the 275 Iraqis elected in January [JURIST Hot Topic news archive] to the nation's first independent parliament in 50 years were sworn in Wednesday, even as several bombs were detonated in the area, attempting to disrupt the proceedings. Iraqi Interim President Ghazi al-Yawer [CBC profile] gave a brief speech to the gathered members, urging them to work together to ensure the future of a free and independent Iraq [interim government website]. The members were then sworn in by Iraqi Chief Justice Medhat al Mahmoud [2004 authored conference paper on the Judicial System in Iraq; DOC] and departed the building. The first official meeting of the parliament scheduled for later in the day met successfully, but was mainly symbolic, as the various factions elected have yet to agree to a power-sharing structure for the new government. The principal task of the new parliamentarians is to draft a permanant constitution for Iraq to replace the current Transitional Administrative Law [CPA text]. JURIST's Paper Chase has continuing coverage of Iraq [JURIST Country news archive]. The Guardian has more.



 

About Paper Chase

Paper Chase is JURIST's real-time legal news service, powered by a team of 30 law student reporters and editors led by law professor Bernard Hibbitts at the University of Pittsburgh School of Law. As an educational service, Paper Chase is dedicated to presenting important legal news and materials rapidly, objectively and intelligibly in an accessible format.

© Copyright JURIST Legal News and Research Services, Inc., 2013.