Gitmo interrogation strategy questionable, FBI memo says

[JURIST] FBI agents at Guantanamo Bay [JURIST Hot Topic archive] concluded the military's aggressive interrogation policy yielded intelligence that was "suspect at best," according to a newly released FBI document [text, PDF]. The report on Gitmo interrogations comes from an internal FBI [JURIST Hot Topic archive] e-mail from May 10, 2004. The e-mail also reported that FBI officials had informed Defense Department officials in 2002 that it had been successful in obtaining confessions using less confrontational interrogation policies. MI Sen. Carl Levin [official website] released the documents Monday, after he received a more complete version after asking the Justice Department to reconsider its release. The memo did not describe what tactics were used in interrogations at Guantanamo Bay. Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld approved the use of harsher interrogation practices in December 2002, but they were halted in January 2003 after their legality was questioned. FBI documents critical of the Defense Department's tactice in Gitmo were previously released [JURIST report] by the ACLU. Read a press release from Levin's office. AP has more.

 

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