Legal news from Wednesday, December 15, 2004
20:12 EDT

[JURIST] The US First Circuit Court of Appeals sitting in Boston ruled Wednesday that the Puerto Rico Supreme Court, not the local US District Court in San Juan, should rule on a case concerning disputed ballots in the territory's November gubernatorial election. The ruling makes it likely that the winner [read more]

19:12 EDT

[JURIST] In a banner day in telecommunications regulation, the Federal Communications Commission Wednesday voted to lessen the strictness of regulations requiring major telephone carriers to lease lines to competitors at federally-mandated rates, and to facilitate wireless Internet access for airplane travellers, but declined to apply indecency standard to satellite radio [read more]

14:12 EDT

[JURIST] Google's use of trademarked names as keywords to trigger advertising by rival companies is legal, according to a ruling Wednesday by US District Judge Leonie Brinkema. Insurance giant Geico brought suit in US District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia, claiming that Google's use of the word "Geico" [read more]

13:12 EDT

[JURIST] British Home Secretary David Blunkett (official Home Office biography here), one of the most powerful ministers in the cabinet of Prime Minister Tony Blair and the minister responsible for pushing sweeping anti-terror legislation through the UK Parliament in the wake of the September 11 terrorist attacks in the US, [read more]

13:12 EDT

[JURIST] The International Court of Justice at The Hague ruled Wednesday that it could not hear a case brought by Serbia and Montenegro against eight NATO countries - Britain, France, Germany, Belgium, Italy, Canada, the Netherlands and Portugal - in respect of NATO's 1999 bombing campaign against Yugoslavia, then led [read more]

11:12 EDT

[JURIST] Critics of a new draft Russian anti-terror law said Wednesday that the legislation recently introduced in the Russian parliament by pro-Kremlin legislators in the wake of the Beslan school massacre this fall is far too broad, and is unduly restrictive of public and press freedoms. The 50-page draft authorizes [read more]

11:12 EDT

[JURIST] A federal judge in Ohio has ruled that the punch-card voting system used in Ohio in 2004 and, notoriously, in Florida in 2000, does not discriminate against voters using it. The ACLU of Ohio had brought a suit arguing that the punch-card system was more error-prone and discriminated against [read more]

11:12 EDT

[JURIST] AP is reporting that Time Warner Inc. has agreed to pay a $210 million fine to settle a Justice Department investigation of securities fraud involving its America Online unit.11:20 AM ET - A full story is now available from AP here. [read more]

10:12 EDT

[JURIST] A circuit court judge in rural Alabama created a constitutional stir Tuesday by wearing a robe embroidered with the text of the Ten Commandments on the bench and insisting on carrying on with a trial despite objections by an attorney appearing before him who said that the display was [read more]

10:12 EDT

[JURIST] The European Parliament in Strasbourg voted Wednesday to support the immediate start of European Commission talks with Turkey that could result in Turkey joining the European Union. The non-binding resolution passed 407-262. The MEPs did, however, insist on closely monitoring Turkey's progress in improving human rights, religious freedom and [read more]

10:12 EDT

[JURIST] Russian oil giant Yukos, currently caught up in a titanic financial struggle with the Russian government over the payment of back taxes (see a Yukos release on the tax claims here) while its imprisoned former CEO Mikhail Khodorkovsky is on trial for fraud, has filed for protection with a [read more]

09:12 EDT

[JURIST] A high level UN panel set up to monitor the administration of the Iraqi oil industry and revenues under Security Council Resolution 1483 [PDF], granting the Coalition Provisional Authority the right to spend from Iraq oil money "in the interests of the Iraqi people", reported Tuesday that it had [read more]

09:12 EDT

[JURIST] Iraq's Defense Minister said Wednesday that Ali Hassan al-Majid, known in the West as "Chemical Ali" for his alleged responsibility for gassing Kurds in northern Iraq in the late 1980s, will be the first of Saddam Hussein's top aides to go on trial, possibly as early as next week [read more]

09:12 EDT

[JURIST] In a ruling much anticipated by members of the philanthropic community across the United States, a Pennsylvania court has ruled that the private art collection owned by the Barnes Foundation - said by some to the most valuable in the country worth somewhere between $6.5 and $30 billion - [read more]

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