Guantanamo detainees challenge military commissions

[JURIST] Defense lawyers for two detainees in Guantanamo Bay have challenged the government's ability to hold trials by a special military commission. A three-member military panel sitting at Guantanamo is hearing a series of motions today disputing the charges and the three-year detention of the detainees. The defense contends the US cannot charge someone for a crime committed before the creation of the commissions and that since Osama bin Laden's al-Qaida organization is not a state, international laws of war do not apply. President Bush ordered the commission three years ago to deal with terror suspects apprehended in Afghanistan. If the panel accepts the motions, the entire trial process will most likely disrupt or postpone trials of other detainees. The Department of Defense has more information about the military commissions here. AP has more.



 

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