Washington Supreme Court upholds mandatory seat belt law

The Washington Supreme Court ruled Friday that the state's mandatory seat belt law was not unconstitutionally vague, even though it 'was hardly the model of clarity.' Read the opinion here. The law had been contested for requiring that certain vehicles meet detailed seat belt specifications that are difficult to locate. The state Supreme Court ruled, however, that there was a presumption of constitutionality that attached to the law, and that the law was such that an ordinary citizen reading the statute would understand that there is a general requirement to wear a seatbelt. The Court also held that stopping an individual solely for a seat belt violation is valid under the law as amended in the state of Washington. The Seattle Post Intelligencer has more.

 

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