International brief ~ Hambali brother sentenced to four years for Jakarta bombing

[JURIST] Indonesian Judge Adullah Sidiq sentenced Rusman Gunawan to four years imprisonment Tuesday for helping fund a bombing committed in Jakarta last year. Gunawan is the brother of alleged South East Asian militant leader Riduan Isamuddin, also known as Hambali (profile here), alleged head of the Jemaah Islamiah (profile here), who is currently being held by the US in an undisclosed location. Gunawan has yet to announce if he will appeal the decision, but did announce his innocence to the court at sentencing. BBC News has more.... Russian President Vladimir Putin signed the Amendments to the Code of the Russian Federation on Administrative Offences into federal law Tuesday. The law creates tighter standards for dealing with administrative lapses in handling migration issues such as foreign workers and expired visas, and creates a shorter time frame for judicial investigation of these offenses. The law also adjusts the penalties for persons committing these offenses including raising fine amounts and specifiying offenses that could result in expulsion from Russian territory. Itar-Tass has more.... Recently elected Indonesian President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono (BBC News profile here) urged Indonesian Attorney General Abdul Rahman Saleh on Tuesday to move quickly on prosecuting cases currently pending, especially those cases involving graft and corruption. Susilo has made corruption one of the major targets of his administration, citing it as the prime reason that foreign investment is so low. Susilo told Saleh, a former Supreme Court Justice with a reputation for honesty, that he expected progress reports on all cases, especially ones like the current investigation into $185 million (USD) embezzlement charges against the state-run Bank Negara Indonesia. Susilo recently told his ministers that he expected them to use 'shock tactics' when dealing with corruption and warned the Attorney General's office, itself known for rampant bribery, that he would be 'watching closely.' The watchdog NGO Transperancy International recently ranked Indonesia (official site in Bahasa Indonesian) as one of the most corrupt nations of the world (rankings here). The Jakarta Post has more.... A Kenyan government committee headed by Vice President Moody Awori announced Tuesday that Supreme Court Chief Justice Evans Gicheru will consider the cases of almost 20,000 inmates being nominated for a community service program as opposed to imprisonment. The suggestions come in an attempt to ease the nation's incarceration crisis, as Kenyan prisons, built to hold 15,000 inmates, currently house over 50,000. The offenders were all sentenced to less than three years for minor or petty offenses and the committee is recommending that they be used for public works projects, saying that this will serve to ease inmate crowding as well as accomplish much needed public upkeep. JURIST's Paper Chase has background on Kenya's inmate crisis. Kenya's Daily Nation (registered site) has more.



 

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