Gitmo detainee court access stymied by government, lawyers say

Defense attorneys for several Guantanamo Bay detainees have told the US District Court for the District of Columbia that, three months after the Supreme Court ruled that the detainees had the right to challenge their imprisonment, none have appeared in a courtroom and few of the 68 detainees who have petitioned for access to federal court have spoken to their attorneys. The defense attorneys say that negotiations with the Justice Department over security clearances, government insistence on monitoring attorney-client conversations, and the number of visits lawyers are allowed have all contributed to the detainees' lack of access to legal help. DOJ attorney Terry Henry told Judge Joyce Hens Green that the government has worked to be "reasonable and fair," saying that "we think we're making extraordinary strides to have these folks have their day in court." Thursday's Washington Post has more. JURIST's Paper Chase has background on the federal court hearings.

 

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