Law in the major papers ~ Schiavo granted right to die, al-Timimi indicted, Pledge rulings barred, NIH collaborations banned, Microsoft sues spammers

Friday's New York Times includes features about the Florida Supreme Court declaring that Gov. Jeb Bush violated separation of powers when he signed a law to keep Theresa Schiavo alive, the sticky problem of illegal immigration, Ali al-Timimi's indictment on charges that in the days after the Sept. 11 attacks he urged a group of Muslim-American men to join a holy war against the United States, the House approved a measure barring federal courts from ruling on the text of the Pledge of Allegiance, while critics call the measure unconstitutional, US Airways planning to ask a bankruptcy court judge today to impose emergency pay cuts of 23 percent on its major unions, which have refused the company's demand for $800 million in contract concessions, and ex-executives of Computer Associates International pleading not guilty yesterday in federal court in Brooklyn to charges of securities fraud and obstruction of justice.

The Washington Post highlights a growing market for illegal ivory in the US, despite harsh penalties, CA Gov. Schwarzenneger vetoeing driving rights for illegal immigrants in the US, scientists at the NIH being banned from any new outside collaborations with pharmaceutical or biotechnology companies for at least one year after the conflict of interest inquiry from last December, and Microsoft filing nine new lawsuits against spammers who send unsolicited e-mail.

 

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