Law in the major papers ~ Oregon lawyer arrest investigation, Moussaoui depositions ruling, airplane ID law challenge

Tuesday's New York Times highlights the Justice Department's opening of an internal investigation into the FBI's arrest of a Muslim lawyer in Oregon who was mistakenly linked to the Madrid train bombings, a federal court determination that accused 9/11 suspect Zacarias Moussaoui may submit written questions to "enemy combatants" held by the United States, and convicted investment banker Frank Quattrone's assertions that the judge who sentenced him acted improperly in disclosing information about his 15-year-old daughter's illness.

The Washington Post notes that World Trade Center leaseholders are being sued for for allegedly failing to protect clean up workers from harmful dust, asbestos, and toxins in the air at Ground Zero, that a judge has dismissed a claim by Paula Jones that New York real estate tycoon Abe Hirschfeld owes her $1 million he had promised if she dropped her lawsuit against President Bill Clinton, and that the Riggs Bank probe continues.

USA Today features articles on a privacy advocate who challenged the rule that requires people to show ID before boarding an airplane and the appeals court that says the federal government must argue its case, on a bankruptcy judge who gave US Airways Group (UAIR) temporary permission Monday to use a government loan to pay for daily operations, and on Enron's announcement it will pay $321 million from the proceeds of its sale of its pipeline arm to finance pension plans for thousands of former employees.

 

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