Sunday briefs

[JURIST] The US Department of Justice Bureau of Justice Statistics [official website] Sunday released a report showing that less than half of all violent crimes committed in the United States in 2000 were actually reported to police, because victims felt the crimes were personal and private matters, or injuries sustained were deemed insignificant. Read Reporting Crime to the Police, 1992-2000.

Also Sunday, former President Jimmy Carter condemned an American war against Iraq in a New York Times editorial suggesting that it was contrary to international law and could not legitimized as a "just war":

Profound changes have been taking place in American foreign policy, reversing consistent bipartisan commitments that for more than two centuries have earned our nation greatness. These commitments have been predicated on basic religious principles, respect for international law, and alliances that resulted in wise decisions and mutual restraint. Our apparent determination to launch a war against Iraq, without international support, is a violation of these premises.
The full text of Just War, or a Just War? is also available from the Carter Center.

Speaking Saturday to law students at Drake Law School [official website], Democratic Presidential candidate Senator John Kerry [official website] derided the Bush's Administration's push for conservative judges, saying that "Our courts should never be the wholly owned subsidiaries of any one political party, any one point of view, any one ideology or any one president." Read more from AP.

 

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