August 20, 2014
by Kimberly Bennett
California Governor Jerry Brown was a presented with a bill on Tuesday to ban sterilization of female inmates in California after the California Senate unanimously voted to pass the law. The bill bans any form of sterilization in a correctional facility for the purposes of birth control unless ...[read more]
February 5, 2014
by Samuel Franklin
European countries are violating the human rights of people trying to change their legal gender, forcing these individuals to undergo, among other things, invasive surgery and sterilization in order to change their legal status, Amnesty International (AI) alleged in a report released Tuesday. ...[read more]
January 28, 2014
by Michael Roberts
The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA), signed into law on March 23, 2010 by President Obama, served as a major overhaul to the health insurance industry and established preventative services as a top priority. The PPACA requires certain preventative health services to be provided ...[read more]
November 5, 2013
by Laura Klein Mullen
Right to Life of Michigan filed a federal lawsuit in the US District Court in the Western District of Michigan on Monday over provisions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) that require insurance companies to provide sterilization, contraceptives and morning after pills. ...[read more]
July 30, 2012
by Rebecca DiLeonardo
A court in Namibia has ruled that the government sterilized three HIV-positive women without obtaining appropriate consent, a legal aid group said Monday. The Southern African Litigation Center (SALC) reported that the court ruled the sterilization of the women improper after finding that they ...[read more]
July 16, 2011
by Dwyer Arce
On July 16, 2007, the US Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit ruled that the spouses and unmarried partners of women who have faced inhumane treatment under Chinese population control measures do not automatically qualify for asylum. The court said section 601(a) of the Illegal Immigration ...[read more]
November 14, 2009
by JURIST Staff
On November 14, 1881, Charles Guiteau went on trial for the assassination of President James A. Garfield. The trial of Guiteau, a probable paranoid, pointed up problems with nineteenth century law's treatment of insanity; Guiteau's trial is also problematic in retrospect as Garfield's death was ...[read more]
July 16, 2007
by Gabriel Haboubi
The US Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit ruled Monday that spouses and unmarried partners of women who face inhumane treatment under rigid Chinese population control measures do not automatically qualify for asylum in the United States. The court said section 601(a) of the Illegal ...[read more]
November 8, 2005
by Kate Heneroty
The Japanese Health and Welfare Ministry announced Tuesday it plans to appeal a court ruling requiring the nation to pay compensation to former Taiwanese leprosy patients who were incarcerated during Japanese colonial rule, between 1916 and 1945. Last month, the Tokyo District Court held that a ...[read more]
April 3, 2003
by Bernard Hibbitts
Recommended readings from the latest legal news: Hawkish lawyer to oversee Iraqi ministries| GuardianLaw-and-order challenge for US as it takes Iraqi city| Christian Science MonitorN.C. Senate votes to drop sterilization law| APAppeals Court Orders OSHA to Set New Exposure Limits for Industrial C... ...[read more]

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