July 21, 2013
by Andrew Morgan
Slavery was a socially accepted and promoted practice in Greek and Roman antiquity and in Eastern empires. The modern practice of human trafficking is another iteration in the history of the international slave trade. An intricate global network connected traders in Africa to merchants in emerging ...[read more]
July 19, 2013
by Zachariah Rivenbark
Even since human slavery was officially banned through the Thirteenth Amendment to the US Constitution, human trafficking continues to present an ongoing problem in the US and abroad. The US State Department reports that between two to four million individuals are trafficked worldwide annually, ...[read more]
July 19, 2013
by Zachariah Rivenbark
Slavery was a socially accepted and promoted practice in Greek and Roman antiquity and in Eastern empires. The modern practice of human trafficking is another iteration in the history of the international slave trade. An intricate global network connected traders in Africa to merchants in emerging ...[read more]
June 10, 2013
by Alex Ferraro
JURIST Guest Columnist Ruthann Robson of the CUNY School of Law argues that requiring manufacturers to label clothing as "sweat-free" is feasible under the First Amendment...Buying a shirt is an ethically fraught endeavor. This is nothing new: the production of clothes has long been interwoven ...[read more]
May 30, 2013
by Kyle Webster
On May 30, 2012, former Liberian president Charles Taylor was sentenced to 50 years in prison for war crimes committed during the civil war in Sierra Leone. The Special Court of Sierra Leone (SPSL) issued the sentence after Taylor was found guilty of planning as well as aiding and abetting crimes ...[read more]
May 25, 2013
by Blake Lynch
A group of UN independent experts on Friday urged South Asian countries to strengthen legislation to prevent caste-based discrimination. In South Asia, those members of society who are of low caste are referred to as "Dalits" or "untouchables." The UN experts noted that Dalits endure " ...[read more]
April 16, 2013
by Zachariah Rivenbark
On April 16, 1862, US President Abraham Lincoln signed "An Act for the Release of certain Persons held to Service or Labor in the District of Columbia" into law. The act abolished slavery in the District of Columbia and created a three-commissioner panel to review petitions for compensation from ...[read more]
April 9, 2013
by Zachariah Rivenbark
On April 9, 1865, Confederate General Robert E. Lee surrendered the Army of Northern Virginia to US General Ulysses S. Grant at Appomattox Court House, Virginia. As part of the surrender, the US paroled Lee's army on the condition that they ceased armed rebellion. In May 1865, US President Andrew ...[read more]
January 6, 2013
by Matthew Pomy
A judge for the US District Court for the Middle District of Tennessee ruled Friday that a Tennessee law that restricts online sex advertising is unconstitutional. The law came in response to concerns of human trafficking in Tennessee and created criminal penalties for advertising commercial sex ...[read more]
December 6, 2012
by Kyle Webster
On December 6, 1865, Georgia's legislature ratified the Thirteenth Amendment, giving it enough support to become part of the US Constitution. The ratification of this amendment eliminated the institution of slavery in the US. Beginning with the Constitution of Vermont, slavery had already been ...[read more]

Support JURIST

We rely on our readers to keep JURIST running

 Donate now!

© Copyright JURIST Legal News and Research Services, Inc., 2013.