April 18, 2013
by Julia Zebley
The US Supreme Court heard oral arguments Wednesday in two cases. In Salinas v. Texas the court considered the boundaries of the Fifth Amendment right to remain silent prior to arrest. Genovevo Salinas was suspected of being involved in a murder. He consented to a search of his home, where police ...[read more]
April 11, 2013
by Sean Gallagher
JURIST Guest Columnists Hank Asbill, Brian Murray, and Andrew Pinson of Jones Day argue that allowing prosecutors to use a defendant's refusal to answer pre-arrest, pre-Miranda law enforcement questioning as substantive evidence of guilt violates the Fifth Amendment and would permit abusive ...[read more]
January 12, 2013
by Julia Zebley
The US Supreme Court granted certiorari in six new cases on Friday. In Salinas v. Texas the court will consider the boundaries of the Fifth Amendment right to remain silent prior to arrest. Genovevo Salinas was suspected of being involved in a murder. He consented to a search of his home, where ...[read more]
May 25, 2012
by Cody Harding
On May 25, 2011, the US District Court for the District of Arizona ruled that accused shooter Jared Lee Loughner was not competent to stand trial due to mental illness. The decision was based on reports that Loughner was schizophrenic. He was charged with the shooting death of Chief Judge John ...[read more]
November 1, 2011
by Cynthia Miley
On November 1, 2007, theSupreme Court of Canadaaffirmed the conviction of Jagrup Singh in a case that tested the right to remain silent as guaranteed in the CanadianCharter of Rights and Freedoms. Singh was convicted of second-degree murder in 2002 and alleged that police continued to question... ...[read more]
June 1, 2011
by Dwyer Arce
On June 1, 2010, the US Supreme Court ruled 5-4 in Berghuis v. Thompkins that when Miranda warnings are properly given, a person wishing to invoke the right to remain silent must do so unambiguously. The court overturned a ruling by the US Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit, which held that ...[read more]
June 22, 2010
by Andrew Morgan
On June 22, 1964, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in Escobedo v. Illinois that suspects have the right to an attorney while they are questioned by police. Danny Escobedo eventually confessed to the murder of his brother-in-law after being detained for hours without access to his lawyer. Over the ...[read more]
June 1, 2010
by Hillary Stemple
The US Supreme Court on Tuesday ruled 5-4 in Berghuis v. Thompkins that when Miranda warnings are properly given, a person wishing to invoke the right to remain silent must do so unambiguously. The court overturned a ruling by the US Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit, which held that the ...[read more]
September 4, 2009
by JURIST Staff
JURIST Special Guest Columnists Judith Sunderland and William Bourdon of Human Rights Watch say that the French government needs to ensure that all suspects in police custody have the right to see a lawyer immediately, have access to a lawyer during interrogation, and are informed of their right ...[read more]
June 22, 2009
by JURIST Staff
On June 22, 1964, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in Escobedo v. Illinois that suspects have the right to an attorney while they are questioned by police. Danny Escobedo eventually confessed to the murder of his brother-in-law after being detained for hours without access to his lawyer. Over the ...[read more]

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