August 6, 2014
by Jason Kellam
JURIST Columnist Adam Banner of the Oklahoma Legal Group discusses the Fourth Amendment implications of warrantless cell phone searches in the context of two recent Supreme Court decisions on the issue... Two cases recently decided by the US Supreme Court will likely have a tremendous impact on ...[read more]
June 12, 2014
by Jaclyn Belczyk
The US Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit ruled Wednesday that police must obtain a warrant to get a person's cell phone location history from the cell phone provider. Police conducting a robbery investigation had obtained four people's cell phone location histories after getting a "D- ...[read more]
April 29, 2014
by Jaclyn Belczyk
The US Supreme Court heard oral arguments Tuesday in a pair of cases dealing with warrantless searches of suspects' cell phones. Riley v. California is a state court case that involves a challenge to searching an arrested individual without a warrant. After being arrested, police examined Riley's ...[read more]
March 19, 2014
by Daniel Mullen
Judge Lucy Koh of the US District Court for the Northern District of California decided on Tuesday not to combine several lawsuits against Google for violating the privacy rights of its Gmail users into a single class action suit. The plaintiffs allege that Google violated state and federal ...[read more]
January 9, 2014
by Taylor Gillan
Bytes for All (B4A), a Pakistani human rights organization focusing on information and communication technologies, has filed suit with the UK Investigatory Powers Tribunal (ITP) against the British government for its cable-tapping program, Tempora. B4A is partnered with Privacy International, ...[read more]
November 22, 2013
by Stephen Adelgren
Five human rights groups urged the UN General Assembly on Thursday to adopt a resolution protecting the right of privacy against unlawful surveillance. In a letter to the assembly, the groups, Amnesty International, Access, Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), Privacy International and Human ...[read more]
October 21, 2013
by Max Slater
The Supreme Court of Georgia ruled Monday that the state's statute prohibiting the solicitation of sodomy is constitutional. The case concerned a former police officer named James Edwin Watson who was convicted of soliciting sex from a 17-year-old boy. Watson argued that the statute violated his ...[read more]
September 20, 2013
by Lauren Laing
Human Rights Watch (HRW) on Friday urged governments around the world to implement stronger laws and policies that protect online privacy in the wake of increasing pervasive electronic surveillance. According to the group, outdated legal frameworks have permitted government surveillance of digital ...[read more]
July 18, 2013
by Endia Vereen
JURIST Guest Columnist Maxwell Slackman, George Mason University School of Law Class of 2014 discusses US Internet privacy standards, the economic ramifications of national security leaks and why the US should compete for foreign Internet consumers... Edward Snowden's recent leaks exposing the ...[read more]
July 12, 2013
by Peter Snyder
Two French human rights groups filed a lawsuit in Paris Thursday calling for an investigation into whether the US National Security Agency (NSA) PRISM program violated French privacy laws. The lawsuit, filed by the International Federation for Human Rights (FIDH) and the Human Rights League (LDH) ...[read more]

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