July 20, 2014
by William Helbling
The US Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit on Saturday postponed an Arizona death row inmate's execution until prison officials reveal details on the two-drug combination that will be used for the lethal injection. Joseph Wood's attorneys argued that their client's First Amendment rights were ...[read more]
July 17, 2014
by Zachariah Rivenbark
District of Columbia v. Heller and McDonald v. Chicago made clear that the Second Amendment protects the right to keep and bear firearms in the home for self-defense, but left unanswered whether it protects other conduct. Writing for the majority in Heller, Scalia emphasized that Heller marked the ...[read more]
July 17, 2014
by Neil Devlin
Washington DC had a set of gun laws that made owning a handgun illegal without a special one-year permit. An additional lock-and-trigger requirement prohibited keeping loaded "fire-ready" guns in DC homes. A policeman, Dick Heller, applied for a permit to possess a handgun in his Washington home. ...[read more]
July 16, 2014
by Addison Morris
The US Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit ruled Monday that Indiana must allow secular humanists to officiate at weddings, despite a state law that bars their participation. The court declared that the law unlawfully discriminates against nonreligious humanists who wish to have their ...[read more]
July 2, 2014
by Peter Snyder
The New York Court of Appeals ruled 5-2 Tuesday that a criminal cyberbullying statute enacted by the Albany County Legislature violated the First Amendment. The defendant, a 15-year-old high school student, was criminally prosecuted under the law after he "anonymously posted sexual information ...[read more]
June 26, 2014
by William Hibbitts
The US Supreme Court ruled Thursday that a Massachusetts law creating a 35-foot protester-free buffer zone around the entrance or driveway of an abortion clinic is unconstitutional. In McCullen v. Coakley the court considered the questions of whether the buffer zone, created by the Reproductive ...[read more]
June 19, 2014
by Josh Guckert
JURIST Guest Columnist Griffen Thorne, Loyola University Chicago School of Law, Class of 2015, discusses the intricacies of double jeopardy and the point at which jeopardy is thought to first occur... Double jeopardy is among the most complex doctrines of constitutional criminal procedure and ...[read more]
June 19, 2014
by Jaclyn Belczyk
The US Supreme Court ruled unanimously Thursday in Lane v. Franks that a public employee's sworn testimony outside the scope of his ordinary job duties is entitled to First Amendment protection. Edward Lane was fired from his job at Central Alabama Community College (CACC) after he determined that ...[read more]
June 17, 2014
by Sarah Steers
Eighteen US states have abolished the death penalty. Three states- Maine, Michigan and Wisconsin- have completely banned the death penalty since the mid-nineteenth century. Fifteen states abolished the death penalty at various points throughout the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. The ...[read more]
June 17, 2014
by Zachariah Rivenbark
Since the US Supreme Court first addressed the death penalty the 1879 case Wilkerson v. Utah, the Court has struggled with determining the penalty's constitutional boundaries. In 1976 the court held in Gregg v. Georgia that the imposition of the death penalty does not always violate the Eighth ...[read more]

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