June 18, 2014
by Jaclyn Belczyk
US officials on Tuesday arrested 89-year-old Johann Breyer on charges that he was a Nazi SS guard at Auschwitz and Buchenwald during World War II. Breyer has admitted to serving at Auschwitz but claims that his service was involuntary and that he did not take part in any killings. Breyer was ...[read more]
May 21, 2014
by Ann Schober
The head of Germany's special Nazi war crimes agency, Kurt Schrimm, announced Monday that his office would soon turn over to state prosecutors the results of investigations into war crimes allegedly committed by several former concentration camp guards. As many as 20 men and women could be ...[read more]
March 25, 2014
by Michael Roberts
Sparked by frustration with the social and economic conditions in Russia during the country's involvement in World War I, the Russian people rioted against Tsar Nicholas II. The Tsar's government collapsed in February 1917, and this "February Revolution" brought a new socialist economic system ...[read more]
February 27, 2014
by Peter Snyder
Beijing's No. 1 Intermediate People's Court on Thursday accepted a lawsuit filed by 37 plaintiffs seeking compensation from two Japanese companies, Mitsubishi Materials and Nippon Coke and Engineering, for forced labor during World War II. The suit alleges that the plaintiffs and their relatives ...[read more]
February 21, 2014
by Stephen Adelgren
German officials on Thursday raided the homes of three men and arrested them for their suspected roles as guards at the Auschwitz death camp during World War II. The men, aged 88, 92 and 94, are currently being detained in the Hohenasperg prison hospital. They are being charged as accessories to ...[read more]
January 8, 2014
by Peter Snyder
A judge for Germany's Hagen State Court on Wednesday dropped the case against 92-year-old Siert Bruins, a former member of the Nazi Waffen SS. Prosecutors had accused Bruins of executing captured Dutch Nazi-opposition fighter Aldert Klaas Dijkema in September 1944 outside the town of Appingedam. ...[read more]
September 20, 2013
by Arjun Mishra
The War Powers Resolution of 1973 resulted from a constitutional battle between the legislative and executive branches in how the United States should commit to military conflicts. Congress traditionally held the power of declaring war, but it has not declared war since December 1941, when the ...[read more]
July 28, 2013
by Kyle Webster
On July 28, 2006, a Turkish court dismissed a lawsuit seeking compensation from novelist Orhan Pamuk, who was sued by six nationalists after he made allegedly unfavorable remarks to a Swiss magazine about Turkey's stance on the mass killing of Armenians during World War II. The lawsuit demanded ...[read more]
July 22, 2013
by Sean Gallagher
In the early 20th century, the US military faced a new challenge with the increased use of radio technology for military operations. Cryptology, the study of codes and how to crack them, emerged as an important tool for military intelligence. It was for this reason that during World War I, the US ...[read more]
July 20, 2013
by Andrew Morgan
The establishment of the ICC by the UN is the final product of fifty years of work aimed at developing an international judicial body with the capability of adjudicating cases of genocide and crimes against humanity. The efforts to create such a body began in 1872 with Hustav Moynier, one of the ...[read more]

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