September 9, 2014
by Ann Schober
The Federal court of Australia has upheld a ruling allowing US-based genetic testing company Myriad Genetics to retain its patent for genetic material (DNA and RNA) it has isolated from human cells. Patient advocacy group Cancer Voices Australia (CVA) appealed a February 2013 court ruling that ...[read more]
July 20, 2013
by Andrew Morgan
The Iraq War began on March 20, 2003 with an invasion by US-led forces and will end December 31, 2011 when the last US forces are scheduled to leave the country. Although the eight-and-a-half year the war was successful in dismantling the regime of Saddam Hussein, it has produced a host of legal ...[read more]
July 20, 2013
by Andrew Morgan
The Iraq War began on March 20, 2003 with an invasion by US-led forces and ended on December 18, 2011 when the last US combat forces left the country. Although the eight-and-a-half year war was successful in dismantling the regime of Saddam Hussein, it has produced a host of legal issues in its ...[read more]
July 10, 2013
by John Paul Regan
JURIST Guest Columnist Bruce Abramson of Rimon PC argues that the US Supreme Court's restraint ensured the protection of useful genetic tools for the foreseeable future...A few months ago, my friend Professor Greg Dolin, MD, JD, Co-Director of the Center for Medicine and Law at the University of ...[read more]
June 13, 2013
by Jaclyn Belczyk
The US Supreme Court ruled unanimously Thursday in Association for Molecular Pathology v. Myriad Genetics, Inc. that a naturally occurring DNA segment is a product of nature and not patent eligible merely because it has been isolated. The court also found that synthetically created DNA known as ...[read more]
April 30, 2013
by John Paul Regan
JURIST Guest Columnist Bruce Abramson of Rimon PC argues that in the absence of sufficient evidence, public policy favors the patentability of genetic tools...The conventional shorthand for the Association for Molecular Pathology v. Myriad, Inc. case, argued before the Supreme Court on April 15, ...[read more]
April 15, 2013
by Michael Haggerson
The US Supreme Court heard oral arguments Monday in Association for Molecular Pathology v. Myriad Genetics, Inc., which deals with the issue of whether human genes are patentable. Myriad Genetics patented two genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, which are isolated genes?different from native genes becaus... ...[read more]
February 15, 2013
by Max Slater
An Australian court ruled Friday that an American biotech company can patent a human gene linked to an increased risk of breast cancer. The Federal Court of Australia held that Myriad Genetics, a US biotech firm, could patent the gene BRCA1 because the gene is not natural, but rather the product ...[read more]
December 1, 2012
by Jaimie Cremeans
US Supreme Court on Friday granted certiorari in Association for Molecular Pathology v. Myriad Genetics, Inc., which deals with the issue of whether human genes are patentable. Myriad Genetics patented two genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, which are isolated genes—different from native genes because th... ...[read more]
September 26, 2012
by Jerry Votava
The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) and the Public Patent Foundation (PUBPAT) on Tuesday asked the US Supreme Court to review the validity of patents on two genes associated with breast and ovarian cancers owned by a Utah company, Myriad Genetics. The patents at issue concern BRCA1 and ...[read more]

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