February 21, 2012
by Hillary Stemple
The US Supreme Court ruled 6-3 Tuesday in Howes v. Fields that a US Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit categorical rule that all private questioning of prisoners about outside events is per se custodial, requiring Miranda warnings to be given, is not clearly established by Supreme Court ...[read more]
June 1, 2011
by Dwyer Arce
On June 1, 2010, the US Supreme Court ruled 5-4 in Berghuis v. Thompkins that when Miranda warnings are properly given, a person wishing to invoke the right to remain silent must do so unambiguously. The court overturned a ruling by the US Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit, which held that ...[read more]
May 26, 2011
by Dwyer Arce
On May 26, 2009, the US Supreme Court ruled 5-4 in Montejo v. Louisiana to overturn its 1986 decision in Michigan v. Jackson, which found that the Sixth Amendment required that police cease interrogations after a suspect had invoked his right to counsel, instead ruling that the Fifth Amendment ...[read more]
April 2, 2011
by Adrienne Lester
JURIST Guest Columnist Amos N. Guiora of the S.J. Quinney College of Law at the University of Utah says that new guidelines regarding questioning terrorism suspects undermine fundamental constitutional protections... The Obama Administration just issued new guidelines to allow more extended ...[read more]
February 23, 2011
by Dwyer Arce
On February 23, 2010, the US Supreme Court ruled 7-2 in Florida v. Powell that the requirements of Miranda v. Arizona were satisfied by advice that a suspect has "the right to talk to a lawyer before answering any of questions," and that he can invoke this right "at any time ... during ...[read more]
June 13, 2010
by Andrew Morgan
On June 13, 1966, the Supreme Court required that a suspect be warned of certain rights before police questioning. Learn more about Miranda v. Arizona... ...[read more]
June 1, 2010
by Hillary Stemple
The US Supreme Court on Tuesday ruled 5-4 in Berghuis v. Thompkins that when Miranda warnings are properly given, a person wishing to invoke the right to remain silent must do so unambiguously. The court overturned a ruling by the US Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit, which held that the ...[read more]
February 23, 2010
by Jaclyn Belczyk
The US Supreme Court on Tuesday ruled 7-2 in Florida v. Powell that the requirements of Miranda v. Arizona are satisfied by advice that a suspect has the right to talk to a lawyer before answering any of questions, and that he can invoke this right at any time ... during thintervie... ...[read more]

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