July 18, 2012
by Leah Kathryn Sell
JURIST Guest Columnist John W. Whitehead president of the Rutherford Institute says that the ban on all non-governmental flags in Lexington, Virginia is motivated specifically by the city's intent to eliminate the display of Confederate flags and thus breaches its citizens' freedom of speech ...[read more]
July 6, 2012
by Rebecca DiLeonardo
The Sons of Confederate Veterans (SCV) on Wednesday signaled to the US District Court for the Western District of Virginia that the group will appeal the court's decision to dismiss the SCV's legal challenge to a Lexington city ordinance relating to the display of the Confederate flag on municipal ...[read more]
April 27, 2010
by JURIST Staff
On April 27, 1861, U.S. President Abraham Lincoln suspended the writ of habeas corpus in Maryland and parts of several midwestern states during the American Civil War. Lincoln took this action to address drafts riots and the threat of secession by Union states bordering the Confederacy. The ...[read more]
April 27, 2010
by Andrew Morgan
On April 27, 1861, U.S. President Abraham Lincoln suspended the writ of habeas corpus in Maryland and parts of several midwestern states during the American Civil War. Lincoln took this action to address drafts riots and the threat of secession by Union states bordering the Confederacy. The ...[read more]
December 31, 2009
by JURIST Staff
On December 31, 1862, U.S. President Abraham Lincoln signed legislation, creating the State of West Virginia. The Bill split the western section of Virginia from the rest of the state, which had left the Union to join the Confederacy. However, West Virginia was not granted formal statehood until ...[read more]
December 8, 2009
by JURIST Staff
On December 8, 1863, President Abraham Lincoln issued a Proclamation offering amnesty to all citizens of the Confederacy who swore an oath to uphold the US constitution. Because of confusion over who was to administer the oath, Lincoln issued another proclamation on March 26, 1864, empowering "any ...[read more]
January 22, 2003
by Bernard Hibbitts
Harvard Law School announced Wednesday that The Oneida Indian Nation of central New York (part of the Iroquois Confederacy) has made a $3 million gift endowing a chair at Harvard Law School for the study of American Indian law... ...[read more]

Support JURIST

We rely on our readers to keep JURIST running

 Donate now!

© Copyright JURIST Legal News and Research Services, Inc., 2013.