30 Oct 2007

JURIST Guest Columnist Fred Cate of Indiana University School of Law Bloomington says that a series of dramatic moves over the past five years - most recently the passage of the Protect America Act - has weakened statutory and judicial oversight of domestic surveillance to the point that one wonders [read more]

29 Oct 2007

JURIST Guest Columnists Amy Ross of the University of Georgia Department of Geography and Chandra Lekha Sriram, Chair of Human Rights at the University of East London School of Law (UK), say that former US Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld's quick exit from a Paris speaking event last week in the [read more]

29 Oct 2007

JURIST Guest Columnist Kent Roach of the University Toronto Faculty of Law says that Canada's parliament needs to slow down and conduct an intelligent debate on the merits of two new anti-terrorism bills introduced in quick succession last week by Canada's minority Conservative government... Canadian Public Safety Minister Stockwell Day [read more]

25 Oct 2007

JURIST Special Guest Columnist William Weaver of the University of Texas El Paso Political Science Department says that the lawsuit by five victims of extraordinary rendition against Boeing subsidiary Jeppesen Dataplan has given the federal judiciary another opportunity to consider its own endorsement of the state secrets privilege, under which [read more]

19 Oct 2007

JURIST Guest Columnist Anthony D'Amato of Northwestern University School of Law says that US Attorney General nominee Michael Mukasey should acknowledge that waterboarding employed by US interrogators is torture, and not attempt to dodge the critical question... Former judge Michael B. Mukasey, nominated by President Bush to serve the United [read more]

18 Oct 2007

JURIST Guest Columnist Benjamin Davis of the University of Toledo College of Law says that US Attorney General nominee Judge Michael Mukasey should take a more forthright stand on the criminality of torture committed by US personnel acting under executive authorization in the "war on terror"... Many of us are [read more]

18 Oct 2007

JURIST Guest Columnist Moeen Cheema, professor of Law & Policy at the Lahore University of Management Sciences in Lahore, Pakistan, says that in its forthcoming ruling on the legal validity of General Pervez Musharraf's candidacy in the country's recent presidential election, the Pakistan Supreme Court is being urged to declare [read more]

15 Oct 2007

JURIST Contributing Editor Ali Khan of Washburn University School of Law says that despite recent remarkable rulings the Supreme Court of Pakistan should avoid venturing further into the treacherous waters of judicial activism and should not disturb the new political deal between President Pervez Musharraf and Benazir Bhutto under which [read more]

11 Oct 2007

JURIST Contributing Editor David Crane of Syracuse University College of Law, former Chief Prosecutor for the UN Special Court for Sierra Leone, announces the launch of Impunity Watch, a new online monitor of human rights abuses worldwide ....This op-ed was written with Cheryl G. Murphy, a 3L attending Syracuse University [read more]

11 Oct 2007

JURIST Guest Columnist Dr. Laurent Pech, Jean Monnet Lecturer in European Union Law at the National University of Ireland, Galway, says that the experience of France - and some principled reflections - should make the US House of Representatives think twice before adopting any resolution labelling the early twentieth-century killings [read more]

8 Oct 2007

JURIST Contributing Editor Marjorie Cohn of Thomas Jefferson School of Law says that the Bush administration's repeated insistence that it has not endorsed the torture of prisoners rings hollow in light of newly-disclosed US Department of Justice memos supporting the harshest techniques the CIA has ever used...The April 2004 publication [read more]

8 Oct 2007

JURIST Guest Columnist Benjamin Davis of the University of Toledo College of Law says that instead of fighting over whether or not to release newly-reported US Department of Justice memos supposedly endorsing torture, the Bush administration should simply release the Red Cross's report on actual US interrogations of prisoners held [read more]

8 Oct 2007

JURIST Contributing Editor Nancy Rapoport of the William S. Boyd School of Law, University of Nevada Las Vegas, says that the apparent willingness of US Department of Justice officials - all the way up to and including former Attorney General Alberto Gonzales - to authorize harsh interrogation techniques in support [read more]

5 Oct 2007

JURIST Guest Columnist Jordan Paust of the University of Houston Law Center says that US legislation now on the books would allow Blackwater personnel reasonably accused of the unlawful killing of persons in Iraq to be prosecuted in US federal or military courts...Does the United States have extraterritorial legislation that [read more]

5 Oct 2007

JURIST Special Guest Columnist and British human and medical rights activist Dr. David Nicholl, a neurologist at Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham, says that the ethical dilemma posed by the continuing involvement of the medical profession in state executions should be resolved by changing the law and eliminating the death penalty [read more]

3 Oct 2007

JURIST Guest Columnists S. James Anaya of the Rogers College of Law, University of Arizona, and Siegfried Wiessner of St. Thomas University School of Law say that the UN General Assembly's recent landslide adoption of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples is a milestone in the re-empowerment [read more]

2 Oct 2007

JURIST Contributing Editor David Crane of Syracuse University College of Law, former Chief Prosecutor for the UN Special Court for Sierra Leone, says that the recent meeting at Chautauqua of nine of the twelve living international prosecutors, spanning the Nuremberg Trials to the International Criminal Court, produced a landmark call [read more]

2 Oct 2007

JURIST Contributing Editor Geoffrey S. Corn, Lt. Col. US Army (Ret.) and former Special Assistant to the Judge Advocate General for Law of War Matters, now a professor at South Texas College of Law, says that effectively controlling the exponential increase in US reliance on civilian contractors in foreign military [read more]

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