29 Nov 2006

JURIST Contributing Editor Douglas Branson of the University of Pittsburgh School of Law says that the latest US corporate scandal involves disclosures of backdated stock options upping the already-disproportionate compensation of CEOs and other senior managers, with criminal charges being laid against five corporate executives so far... A November 17, [read more]

22 Nov 2006

JURIST Guest Columnist Richard Edwards, Principal Lecturer in Law at the University of the West of England in Bristol, UK, says that the ongoing 'Cash for Honours' investigation into whether benefactors of Britain's ruling Labour Party made loans or donations in order to secure peerages points up the problematic position [read more]

22 Nov 2006

JURIST Guest Columnist Carl Tobias of the University of Richmond School of Law says that while the US federal judiciary has much to be thankful on this Thanksgiving, it and the nation will be even better off if Democrats and Republicans end their partisan wrangling and work together on key [read more]

19 Nov 2006

JURIST Guest Columnist Benjamin Davis of the University of Toledo College of Law says that despite recent disparaging comments by US Homeland Secretary Michael Chertoff, international law is also American law, and we must respect our obligations as citizens of the international community, not arbitrarily dismiss or avoid them so [read more]

13 Nov 2006

JURIST Guest Columnist James Friedman of the University of Maine School of Law says that the veil of secrecy with which the United States has shrouded the detention and interrogation of terrorism suspects makes the rule of law impossible to determine and thus to maintain. ... For over three years [read more]

13 Nov 2006

JURIST Special Guest Columnist John Pace, former Human Rights Chief for the UN Assistance Mission in Iraq, says that the trial of Saddam Hussein has abjectly failed to do justice to his victims, provide a deterrent to future dictators, or generally advance the cause of freedom... In an interview with [read more]

9 Nov 2006

JURIST Special Guest Columnist Giovanni Di Stefano, an Italian lawyer who has represented Saddam Hussein and former Iraqi Deputy Prime Minister Tariq Aziz, says that the recent trial of Hussein and seven co-defendants for crimes against humanity in Dujail is problematic not only as regards Saddam, but also in its [read more]

9 Nov 2006

JURIST Contributing Editor Marjorie Cohn of Thomas Jefferson School of Law, president of the National Lawyers Guild, says that although Donald Rumsfeld is resigning as US Secretary of Defense, steps should be and will be taken to hold him accountable for breaches of international law and even war crimes sanctioned [read more]

8 Nov 2006

JURIST Contributing Editor Peter Shane of Moritz College of Law, Ohio State University, says that Democrats taking over Congress in the wake of the mid-term elections should begin by reasserting constitutional checks and balances in a wide range of critical policy areas... With only their control of the Senate in [read more]

7 Nov 2006

JURIST Guest Columnist Ilya Somin of the George Mason University School of Law says that while political ignorance among voters is more the byproduct of rational calculation than laziness or stupidity, one way to address the problem is to reduce the size and complexity of government... Nancy Pelosi may soon [read more]

7 Nov 2006

JURIST Contributing Editor Geoffrey S. Corn, Lt. Col. US Army (Ret.) and former Special Assistant to the Judge Advocate General for Law of War Matters, now a professor at South Texas College of Law, says that Americans going to the polls with the Iraq war on their minds might reflect [read more]

7 Nov 2006

JURIST Contributing Editor David Crane of Syracuse University College of Law, former Chief Prosecutor for the UN Special Court for Sierra Leone, says that the Dujail crimes against humanity trial of Saddam Hussein before the Iraqi High Tribunal was hardly perfect, but it was nonetheless a step forward for the [read more]

7 Nov 2006

JURIST Guest Columnist Lawrence Douglas, Professor of Law, Jurisprudence and Social Thought at Amherst College, says the trial of Saddam Hussein had little didactic value in Iraq for various reasons, but it could ironically have more impact in America on the eve of mid-term elections... President Bush hailed the verdict [read more]

6 Nov 2006

JURIST Special Guest Columnist Curtis Doebbler, an American member of Saddam Hussein's legal defense team and a professor of law at An-Najah National University on the Palestinian West Bank, says that the Dujail trial was one of the worst abuses of justice in modern history, a classic instance of "victor's [read more]

6 Nov 2006

JURIST Guest Columnist Chibli Mallat, visiting professor at Princeton University and a prominent Middle East human rights lawyer who in 2003 turned down an invitation to join the Iraqi Special Tribunal that would judge Saddam Hussein, says that even given the chaos of the Dujail trial it is not too [read more]

5 Nov 2006

JURIST Guest Columnist Michael Kelly of Creighton University School of Law says that the trials of Saddam Hussein should continue and his death sentence in the Dujail case should be stayed at least until two other key proceedings against him are completed... Saddam Hussein has been sentenced to death by [read more]

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