26 Oct 2006

JURIST Contributing Editor Michael A. Olivas of the University of Houston Law Center says that the Secure Fence Act signed into law by President Bush and authorizing the construction of a 700-mile barrier along part of the US border with Mexico is a shortsighted election-time absurdity that cannot work... I [read more]

24 Oct 2006

JURIST Contributing Editor Nancy Rapoport of the University of Houston Law Center says that the 24-year prison sentence handed down for former Enron CEO Jeffrey Skilling leaves us all disappointed, not necessarily in the sentence, but in the corporate conduct that led to Enron's collapse and the huge losses that [read more]

23 Oct 2006

JURIST Guest Columnist and former Nuremberg war crimes prosecutor Henry King, Jr., now at Case Western Law School, and JURIST Contributing Editor David Crane, former Chief Prosecutor of the Special Court for Sierra Leone now at Syracuse University College of Law, says that the passage of the Military Commissions Act [read more]

18 Oct 2006

JURIST Guest Columnist David Harris of the University of Toledo College of Law says that despite calls from some quarters for more aggressive immigration control across the United States, local police want nothing to do with immigration enforcement, and they're right.... As we approach the midterm elections, illegal immigration remains [read more]

17 Oct 2006

JURIST Guest Columnist Anthony D'Amato of Northwestern University School of Law says that the recent UN Security Council resolution on North Korea passed in the wake of its nuclear test is a precedent-setting instance of aggressive collective action against would-be nuclear proliferation that could impact Iran, Israel, and other potential [read more]

16 Oct 2006

JURIST Special Guest Columnist Paul Halliday of the University of Virginia Department of History says that before signing the Military Commissions Act suspending the writ of habeas corpus for alien "enemy combatants," President Bush should reflect on the English experience with suspending and then reviving the writ in the midst [read more]

13 Oct 2006

JURIST Guest Columnist Chibli Mallat, visiting professor at Princeton University and the EU Jean Monnet Professor in Law at St. Joseph's University in Beirut, Lebanon, says that Iraq's constitutional response to pluralism may yet make it an example to the world... Criticism of post-invasion Iraq has become a cottage industry; [read more]

11 Oct 2006

JURIST Guest Columnist Don Rothwell of ANU College of Law, Australian National University, says that while passage of the new Military Commissions Act in the United States presents new challenges for Australian Guantanamo detainee David Hicks, it also creates an opportunity for the Australian government to reconsider its erstwhile refusal [read more]

9 Oct 2006

JURIST Guest Columnist Douglas Branson of the University of Pittsburgh School of Law says that the frenzy over the Hewlett-Packard pretexting scandal overlooks not only much that is positive about the company's record, but also the dubious legal advice that the now-indicted corporate leaders received from their outside counsel... Three [read more]

9 Oct 2006

JURIST Contributing Editor Jeffrey Addicott of St. Mary's University School of Law, formerly a Lieutenant Colonel in the US Army Judge Advocate General's Corps, says the new Military Commissions Act reflects a clear and much-needed Congressional commitment to the war on terror, which to this point has been largely conducted [read more]

5 Oct 2006

JURIST Guest Columnist Kermit Roosevelt of the University of Pennsylvania Law School says that the question of whether the US government can seize aliens and put them beyond the reach of law goes to the heart of who we are and what we want to become... Today, October 5, law [read more]

2 Oct 2006

JURIST Guest Columnist Adam Samaha of the University of Chicago Law School says that this Term's US Supreme Court cases will likely reveal whether we have a new boss on the Court who can push its decisions in new directions, or whether we have an old boss in the form [read more]

2 Oct 2006

JURIST Guest Columnist Douglas Branson of the University of Pittsburgh School of Law says that a comparison of the Andrew Fastow and Bernard Ebbers corporate fraud cases suggests that the sentences handed down for the two former high-flying executives - 6 and 25 years respectively - are unduly disparate and [read more]

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